Author: admin

Massage for Leg Pain

Massage for Leg Pain

A strained adductor muscle or tendon can be a tenacious, enduring injury, causing a persistent pain in the inner thigh. If a person feels pain high up near the groin, he or she has injured the tendon of one of the four primary adductor muscles: the gracilis, adductor longus, adductor brevis, or adductor Magnus. If the pain is toward the mid-thigh, the muscle fibers are injured. Pain in both places indicates damage to both tendon and muscle fibers.

Read More Massage for Leg Pain

Massage for Calf Injuries

Massage for Calf Injuries

Pain that occurs in the calf muscle on the lower part of the leg often is the result of a pulled or torn calf muscle.

A torn calf muscle is similar to an Achilles tendon tear or rupture but occurs higher up in the back of the leg. A sign of a torn calf muscle is similar to that of an Achilles tendon rupture. You may think you’ve just been hit in the leg and potentially hear a “pop.” There is sudden pain in the back of the calf. Then you’ll experience pain, swelling, or bruising in the calf muscle, and you’ll have difficulty walking properly or standing on your toes.

Read More Massage for Calf Injuries

Massage for Hip & Thigh Pain

Massage for Hip & Thigh Pain

Patients will describe referral patterns from myofascial trigger points in the tensor fascia lata muscle, as pain in the hip and down the front side of their thigh (Images 1A and 2).

Other symptoms include tenderness and pain, from the pressure of the patient’s own body weight, which prevents them from laying on the affected side. Patients can lay on their opposite side by placing a pillow between their knees. The pillow prevents the tensor fascia lata, and the other hip abductors on the painful side from being lengthened, which can activate trigger points. If both sides are too painful, the patient will sleep on their back with a pillow under their legs or in a reclining chair.

Read More Massage for Hip & Thigh Pain

Massage for Hip Pain

Massage for Hip Pain

The iliotibial band (IT band) is a thick band of fibers that begins at the iliac crest (the border of the most prominent bone of the pelvis) in the pelvis and runs on the lateral or outside part of the thigh until it attaches to the tibia (shinbone). The gluteal or buttock muscle fibers and the tensor fascia latae (muscles of the hip joint) attach to it, and the band acts to coordinate muscle function and stabilize the knee during running.

Read More Massage for Hip Pain

Massage for Torso Pain

Massage for Torso Pain

Massage is one of the ancient arts of wellness. The first mentions of massage occurred in China in 2700 BCE, but it was not long before it spread to the Middle East, Greece, and India. Massage is the manipulation of the soft tissues of the body. The goal of this manipulation is to promote relaxation and stress relief while easing pain and promoting an overall feeling of wellness. Physically speaking, massage also increases oxygen and blood flow to muscles. This can, in turn, promote your brain’s release of serotonin, the relaxation chemical. We know that most people suffer from pain in their back, neck, and shoulders due to today’s working conditions. Because of this, we’ll look at the best massage for back pain specifically, as well as styles that can help with other pain conditions.

Read More Massage for Torso Pain

Sciatica

Sciatica

The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in the body and sciatica is an umbrella term given to any sort of pain that is caused by irritation or compression of the sciatic nerve.

Symptoms include leg pain, sometimes accompanied by tingling, numbness, or weakness.

It originates in the lower back and travels through the buttock and down the large sciatic nerve behind the thigh and the pain can radiate down below the

Read More Sciatica

Low Back Spasms

Low Back Spasms

Low back pain is one of the top reasons people seek medical attention in the U.S., and it is notoriously tough to treat. Studies show very few medical therapies, from medications to injections to surgeries, reliably relieve it, and some can aggravate the problem.

The new study randomly assigned 400 adults with moderate-to-severe low back pain lasting for at least three months to either weekly whole-body massages for relaxation, weekly massages that focused on specific muscle problems around the lower back and hips, or usual care.

Read More Low Back Spasms

In Memory Memoriam Tribute to John Steven Harris ( John Harris ) LMT in Santa Barbara, Ca. 1945-2015, Obituaries.

In Memory Memoriam Tribute to John Steven Harris ( John Harris )  LMT in Santa Barbara, Ca. 1945-2015, Obituaries.

☮ John Harris has been an internationally recognized therapist and trainer in myofascial therapies for over 30 years. He was an early pioneer of sports massage and is the co-author of the book Fix Pain. He currently teaches for the Santa Barbara Body Therapy Institute and conducts a private practice in Trigger Point Therapy. In an interview, I asked him about his experiences.

Read More In Memory Memoriam Tribute to John Steven Harris ( John Harris ) LMT in Santa Barbara, Ca. 1945-2015, Obituaries.

Upper Back Spasms

Upper Back Spasms

How do you treat upper back spasms?

Use an ice pack and an over-the-counter pain reliever such as acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen. After the inflammation calms down, a heating pad or pack can help soothe muscles and connective tissue. If you have chronic back pain, sleep on a medium-firm mattress.
Your upper and middle back area is less prone to trouble than your lower back. That’s because it doesn’t bear as much of a load of your body’s weight and work as your lower back does. But this area, which runs from the base of your neck to the bottom of your rib cage, can still be a source of pain.

Read More Upper Back Spasms