Category: Sports Recovery Massage Santa Barbara

Massage for Tennis Players

Massage for Tennis Players

What is Riktr PRO Massage Special Tennis Massage?

It’s a combination of Deep Tissue Massage, Sports Massage, and Swedish Massage. Would recommend at least a 1 1/2 or a 2-hour session to get you tuned back up for the courts. Depending on your specific issues you may need more massage sessions.

If you have tennis elbow Sports massage can be very beneficial in the treatment of tennis elbow. Tennis elbow is usually a technical problem or an overuse injury. Massage flushes out the area,  deep tissue breaks down the fascia, soft tissue release and transverse techniques realign the muscle fibers.

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Sports Massage

The purpose of sports massage therapy is to help alleviate the stress and tension which builds up in the body’s soft tissues during physical activity. Where minor injuries and lesions occur, due to overexertion and/or overuse, massage can break them down quickly and effectively. Above all, it can help prevent those bothersome injuries that so often get in the way of performance and your athletic goals, whether one is an athlete,  or a once a week jogger.

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Sports Recovery

Sports Recovery

Sometimes a “truth” is not what it seems. Take lactic acid. For years, many massage therapists have been taught that lactic acid can and should be flushed from the muscles of athletes after intense activity. This truism has been passed on to clients who have also accepted it as fact. Both therapist and client thus have established and perpetuated a mutual belief system that purging of lactic acid is not only necessary but also efficiently accomplished with the assistance of massage. Some beliefs die hard. This one and others related to lactic acid have been holding their own, not only in some massage schools and practices but also in the community at large, despite emerging research to the contrary. Pass the word. There’s no need to mess with Mother Nature.

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Sports Flush

Sports Flush

Should you spring for a stint in the post-marathon massage tent? Get a regular rubdown to help your recovery as you train? Research shows that sports massage doesn’t always do what you think it does—but it may still help you recover from a tough workout.

Most importantly: Sports massage doesn’t flush lactic acid, or other “toxins,” from your muscles. Lactic acid is produced during exercise, and you might associate it with a burning feeling during hard work, but it’s not a problem, isn’t responsible for next-day soreness, and doesn’t need help to be removed from the muscles.

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Sports Massage & Recovery Time

Sports Massage & Recovery Time

The purpose of sports massage therapy is to help alleviate the stress and tension which builds up in the body’s soft tissues during physical activity. Where minor injuries and lesions occur, due to overexertion and/or overuse, massage can break them down quickly and effectively. Above all, it can help prevent those bothersome injuries that so often get in the way of performance and your athletic goals, whether one is an athlete,  or a once a week jogger.

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ACL – Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear, Strain

ACL – Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear, Strain

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a cruciate ligament which is one of the four major ligaments of the human knee. In the quadruped stifle (analogous to the knee), based on its anatomical position, it is referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament.[1]

The ACL originates from deep within the notch of the distal femur. Its proximal fibers fan out along the medial wall of the lateral femoral condyle. There are two bundles of the ACL—the anteromedial and the posterolateral, named according to where the bundles insert into the tibial plateau. The ACL attaches in front of the intercondyloid eminence of the tibia, being blended with the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus. These attachments allow it to resist anterior translation of the tibia, in relation to the femur.

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