Category: sports massages for athletes in Santa Barbara

Massage for Calf Injuries

Massage for Calf Injuries

Pain that occurs in the calf muscle on the lower part of the leg often is the result of a pulled or torn calf muscle.

A torn calf muscle is similar to an Achilles tendon tear or rupture but occurs higher up in the back of the leg. A sign of a torn calf muscle is similar to that of an Achilles tendon rupture. You may think you’ve just been hit in the leg and potentially hear a “pop.” There is sudden pain in the back of the calf. Then you’ll experience pain, swelling, or bruising in the calf muscle, and you’ll have difficulty walking properly or standing on your toes.

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Massage for Hip Pain

Massage for Hip Pain

The iliotibial band (IT band) is a thick band of fibers that begins at the iliac crest (the border of the most prominent bone of the pelvis) in the pelvis and runs on the lateral or outside part of the thigh until it attaches to the tibia (shinbone). The gluteal or buttock muscle fibers and the tensor fascia latae (muscles of the hip joint) attach to it, and the band acts to coordinate muscle function and stabilize the knee during running.

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Upper Back Spasms

Upper Back Spasms

How do you treat upper back spasms?

Use an ice pack and an over-the-counter pain reliever such as acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen. After the inflammation calms down, a heating pad or pack can help soothe muscles and connective tissue. If you have chronic back pain, sleep on a medium-firm mattress.
Your upper and middle back area is less prone to trouble than your lower back. That’s because it doesn’t bear as much of a load of your body’s weight and work as your lower back does. But this area, which runs from the base of your neck to the bottom of your rib cage, can still be a source of pain.

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Benefits of Understanding Deep Tissue Massage

Benefits of Understanding Deep Tissue Massage

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader. These statements are not expressions of legal opinion relative to the scope of practice, medical diagnosis, or medical advice, nor do they represent an endorsement of any product, company, or specific massage therapy technique, modality, or approach. All trademarks, registered trademarks, brand names, registered brand names, logos, and company logos referenced in this post are the property of their owners.

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Shin Splints

Shin Splints

That is something most of us have wondered at some point. Shin splints has halted most runners at some point, and can be heartbreaking for runners who have just started to get going when that familiar pain makes an appearance and risks our racing schedule.

Medial tibial stress syndrome, more commonly referred to as “shin splints,” is probably the most universally-known running injury.

Shin splints usually appears as an aching pain on the inside of the shin, near the border of the tibia and the calf muscles.

The area will often be sore when poked or prodded, and will initially hurt at the end of a run.

If you keep running on shin splints, the pain will move to a more sharp, burning sensation, and may hurt during your entire run, or even when walking.

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