Category: Athletic Sports Massage Santa Barbara

Low Back Spasms

Low Back Spasms

Low back pain is one of the top reasons people seek medical attention in the U.S., and it is notoriously tough to treat. Studies show very few medical therapies, from medications to injections to surgeries, reliably relieve it, and some can aggravate the problem.

The new study randomly assigned 400 adults with moderate-to-severe low back pain lasting for at least three months to either weekly whole-body massages for relaxation, weekly massages that focused on specific muscle problems around the lower back and hips, or usual care.

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Neck and Arm Pain

Neck and Arm Pain

Massage can relieve neck pain if it’s done often by a professional therapist and for the correct length of time, according to new research.

One-hour sessions two or three times a week appear to be best, said study researcher Karen Sherman, a senior scientific investigator at Group Health Research Institute in Seattle.

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Shin Splints

Shin Splints

That is something most of us have wondered at some point. Shin splints has halted most runners at some point, and can be heartbreaking for runners who have just started to get going when that familiar pain makes an appearance and risks our racing schedule.

Medial tibial stress syndrome, more commonly referred to as “shin splints,” is probably the most universally-known running injury.

Shin splints usually appears as an aching pain on the inside of the shin, near the border of the tibia and the calf muscles.

The area will often be sore when poked or prodded, and will initially hurt at the end of a run.

If you keep running on shin splints, the pain will move to a more sharp, burning sensation, and may hurt during your entire run, or even when walking.

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Therapeutic Sports Massage

Therapeutic Sports Massage

Sports Massage – Sports massage is designed to enhance athletic performance and recovery. There are three contexts in which sports massage can be useful to an athlete: pre-event, post-event, and injury treatment. It’s more vigorous than a Swedish Massage.
The purpose of sports massage therapy is to help alleviate the stress and tension which builds up in the body’s soft tissues during physical activity. Where minor injuries and lesions occur, due to overexertion and/or overuse, massage can break them down quickly and effectively. Above all, it can help prevent those bothersome injuries that so often get in the way of performance and your athletic goals, whether one is an athlete,  or a once a week jogger.

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UCSB Student Massage

UCSB Student Massage

Deep tissue massage is a massage that is designed to get into the connective tissue of the body, rather than just the surface muscles. As a massage therapist when I perform deep tissue I use a variety of techniques to deeply penetrate the muscles and fascia, loosening them and releasing tension. Most clients have a more intense experience with a deep tissue massage, but also feel that it is more beneficial because it addresses deep-seated muscle pains. Deep tissue is beneficial when undertaken on a regular basis, so that I can work together with the client to correct long term problems, relax the body, and prevent injury.

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Massage for Hikers

Massage for Hikers

What is Nicola’s Special Hiking Massage for Santa Barbara area hikers?

It’s a combination of Deep Tissue Massage, Sports Massage, and Swedish Massage. I recommend at least a 1 1/2 hour session to get you tuned back up for the trails. Depending on your specific issues you may need more massage sessions.

What are the Benefits of a hiker Massage?

Alleviate low-back pain and improve range of motion.
Flush out the lactic acid in your legs and body.
Ease of medication dependence.
Enhance immunity by stimulating lymph flow—the body’s natural defense system.
Exercise and stretch weak, tight, or atrophied muscles.
Help athletes of any level prepare for and recover from, strenuous workouts or hikes.
Improve the condition of the body’s largest organ—the skin.
Increase joint flexibility.
Lessen depression and anxiety.
Promote tissue regeneration, reducing scar tissue, and stretch marks.
Pump oxygen and nutrients into tissues and vital organs, improving circulation.
Reduce post-surgery adhesions and swelling.
Reduce spasms and cramping.
Relax and soften injured, tired, and overused muscles.
Release endorphins—amino acids that work as the body’s natural painkiller.
Relieve migraine pain.

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