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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines,  TMJ syndrome Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Massage,   Shoulder Pain & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back Pain, Low Back Pain Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh Pain, Hamstring Pain and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Manual Lymphatic Drainage Massage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for muscular pain relief and overall stress relief.

 

Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Classic MassageRelaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments  at his massage studio.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

A mandala containing symbols from 16 of our world`s many spiritual traditions, designed for honoring all paths to truth. Includes the Jewish Star of David, Buddhist Prayer Wheel, Native  American Medicine Wheel, Christian Cross, Hindu Om, Great Goddess, Taoist Ying Yang, Islamic Moon  and Star, Winged Sufi Heart, Sikh Symbol, Baha`i Star, African Goddess, Zoroastrian Flame, Confucian  Circle and Dot, Wiccan Pentacle and Egyptian Ankh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A mandala containing symbols from 16 of our world`s many spiritual traditions, designed for honoring all paths to truth. Includes the Jewish Star of David, Buddhist Prayer Wheel, Native American Medicine Wheel, Christian Cross, Hindu Om, Great Goddess, Taoist Ying Yang, Islamic Moon and Star, Winged Sufi Heart, Sikh Symbol, Baha`i Star, African Goddess, Zoroastrian Flame, Confucian Circle and Dot, Wiccan Pentacle and Egyptian Ankh.

Therapeutic Healing Bodywork by NiCoLa!

 

Santa Barbara Massage. Nicola is a California State Licensed and Insured CMP (Certified Massage Practitioner) Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warning-Massage can become Addicting!           Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage.  Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482

 

Warning- Good Bodywork can become Addicting!

If you appreciate high quality bodywork or just want to RELAX and go to “LA LA LAND” call Nicola.  Are you a serious athlete and need EXTREME bodywork or “FIX IT” work, weekend warrior with injuries or just want to keep that body tuned up? Then you have finally found your Santa Barbara Licensed and Insured Massage Therapist.

Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licensed Massage Therapist) Professional Body Worker, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available!

 

 
Get into the ZONE…the PARASYMPATHETIC Zone
 
 

 

My style of Deep Tissue Massage releases the body’s natural painkillers whereby it stimulates the release of endorphins, the morphine-like substances that the body manufactures into the brain and nervous system. Once that happens (your now in a parasympathetic state  (“rest and digest”) I then go to work on your sore or injured areas to break up the damaged fibrous adhesion’s which are spread randomly though out a muscle’s tissue thus increasing blood flow, oxygen, strength, flexibility and tissue re-building. I use a variety of modalities to accomplish this: Swedish: This is your basic massage modality which incorporates long gentle strokes to increase blood flow to and from the muscles. Myofascial Release: This technique involves slower and deeper pressure into the muscle tissue to assist in breaking up adhesions and scar tissue in the muscle. Neuromuscular Release, NMT, Neuromuscular Re-Education, Body Pattern Synchronization (Call it what you want… everybody gives it their own name but we are all trying to do the same thing): This technique is “point-specific” work which targets muscle adhesion’s, muscle spindles in the belly of the muscle, trigger points that restrict normal flow of the nervous system to the muscles. Once the adhesion’s are broken up the client usually experiences an increase in range of motion, strength, and speed. ActiveRange of Motion:This technique is a stretching modality which takes the client through his or her normal range of motion to assist motor control and aids in the reduction of scar tissue and muscle adhesions. Active Isolated Stretching: This technique involves stretching which incorporates a process called reciprocal inhibition  (RI) to stretch the muscle as well as increase kinesthetic awareness of the body.

The key to “My STYLE” is an aggressive approach combined with sustained pressure ( increasing Ischemic blood supply) over time and a spiritual component.

(This diagram link explains this process)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does Riktr mean?

Derived from “Off the Richter Scale” meaning that something is excellent, very good, over the top, on the edge, awesome, fantastic or amazing.

Nice Quotes:

The strongest of all warriors are these two: Time and Patience.– Leo Tolstoi Patience, persistence and perspiration make an unbeatable combination for success.- Napolean Hill If only we arrange our life according to that principle which counsels us that we must always hold to the difficult, then that which now still seems to us the most alien will become what we most trust and find most faithful. – Rilke (Rilke on love an other difficulties-translations and considerations of Rainer Maria Rilke by John J. L. Mood) I tell you that I have a long way to go before I am –where one begins… – Rilke Resolve to be always beginning—to be a beginner. -Rilke ” The harder you work, the luckier you get.” – Gary Player, golfer “Nothing happens until something moves.” Albert Einstein As Dr. Rolf said, “Put the tissue where it should be and then ask for movement.” Our sorrows and wounds are healed only when we touch them with compassion. – Buddha Once you label me you negate me.  -Søren Kierkegaard I must find a truth that is true for me. Søren Kierkegaard   Click here for: other nice quotes

FYI: Where does Riktr’s healing energy come from: These pictures say it all.

God’s Universal Energy or Chi, Ki, Ka, Xi, Netter, Ihund, Life Force, Prana, Holy Spirit, Ruhuh, Biomagnetic Energy or Innate Intelligence starts here. Click these links for more on Universal Energy.

The Earth is part of  universal energy.

Check out this video called “Healing the Hearts of Humanity”   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aKcvgTvIMQ&feature=related

The earth captures Universal magnetic energy in many different ways and stores it.

Check out this video called “The Awakening of The Cosmic Heart (The Core Rainbow)”   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es-YbHlBKtU&NR=1

Magnetic universal energy is stored in the earth’s core and then is released.

The earth unleashes it’s energy in different ways.

Keeping your third eye open lets all the magnetic energy flow in and out of your body.

Human beings collect, store and release the magnetic energy.

Human beings collect, store and release magnetic energy some more than others.

 

Check out these links for Healing Sounds!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URFnBeW423E http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73J05gjmMgw http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=HEALING+SOUNDS&aq=f

MASSAGE IS

M—Message of caring A—Aesthetics for the body S—Sacred touch S—Soothing of tension A—Anthology for the body G—General healing E—Energy balanced Massage Is a … Healing time for regeneration. Special time for individuation. Quiet time for imagination. Restful time for gratification. Sacred time for reflection. Sensational time with an exclamation!

by Joan Donato 

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

 

MSN Business Directory  

 

Classic Standard Massage verses Swedish massage. Effleurage, Petrissage, Tapotement or Rhythmic Tapping, Friction, Vibration or Shaking

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“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00 (1st time client’s) Mon – Fri

plus  offering senior and  veteran  In-call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

 

Our Journey of life

Our Journey of life

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines,  TMJ syndrome Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Massage,   Shoulder Pain & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back Pain, Low Back Pain Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh Pain, Hamstring Pain and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Manual Lymphatic Drainage Massage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for muscular pain relief and overall stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments at his massage studio.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

Standard Massage verses Swedish massage the style is referred to as “classic massage”.

Massage involves working and acting on the body with pressure – structured, unstructured, stationary, or moving – tension, motion, or vibration, done manually or with mechanical aids. Massage can be applied with the hands, fingers, elbows, knees, forearm, feet, or a massage device. Massage can promote relaxation and well-being,[1][2] can be a recreational activity, and can be sexual in nature (see Erotic massage).

The word comes from the French massage “friction of kneading”, or from Arabic massage meaning “to touch, feel” or from Latin massa meaning “mass, dough”,[3][4] cf. Greek verb μάσσω (massō) “to handle, touch, to work with the hands, to knead dough”.[5] In distinction the ancient Greek word for massage was anatripsis,[6] and the Latin was frictio.

In professional settings massage clients are treated while lying on a massage table, sitting in a massage chair, or lying on a mat on the floor, while in amateur settings a general purpose surface like a bed or floor is more common. Aquatic massage and bodywork is performed with recipients submersed or floating in a warm-water therapy pool. The massage subject may be fully or partially clothed or unclothed.

Swedish massage the style is referred to as “classic massage”.

The most widely recognized and commonly used category of massage is the Swedish massage. The Swedish massage techniques vary from light to vigorous.[42] Swedish massage uses five styles of strokes. The five basic strokes are effleurage (sliding or gliding), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (rhythmic tapping), friction (cross fiber or with the fibers) and vibration/shaking.[43] Swedish massage has shown to be helpful in reducing pain, joint stiffness, and improving function in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee over a period of eight weeks.[44] The development of Swedish massage is often inaccurately credited to Per Henrik Ling, though the Dutch practitioner Johann Georg Mezger applied the French terms to name the basic strokes.[45] The term “Swedish” massage is actually only recognized in English and Dutch speaking countries, and in Hungary. Elsewhere (including Sweden) the style is referred to as “classic massage”.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Swedish massage techniques are different from other massage techniques in that they are quite specific in the order in which the massage is done. These techniques apply deeper pressure than other kind of massages and they are also known to increase oxygenation of blood and release metabolic waste such as lactic and uric acids from the tissues of the muscles.

Swedish Massage TechniquesThis can be particularly important for athletes who find that exercise causes build-up of lactic acids in the muscles, which the massage can dislodge and replace with fresh oxygenated blood.

Swedish massage techniques can help not only relieve physical stress but also emotional stress and can have other medical and therapeutic uses.

Swedish massage is known to help with reducing joint pain and stiffness, and has also been known to help those with osteoarthritis.

Those who undergo this kind of massage also report to enjoying enhanced flexibility. These particular massage techniques are also thought to help improve blood circulation.

Swedish massage is also known as ‘Classic Massage’ in certain areas of the world.

The 5 main Swedish massage techniques as they were developed by Swedish doctor Per Henrik Ling, a physical therapist, developer and teacher of medical-gymnastics are –

1. Effleurage

These are the sliding or gliding Swedish massage techniques that cover different areas of the body. They are long sweeping strokes that alternate between firm and light pressure and with can be performed using the palm of the hand or the fingertips. The knots and tension in the muscles tend to get broken with this massage technique.

2. Petrissage

This is the technique of kneading the muscles of the body to attain deeper massage penetration. The thumbs and the knuckles of the fingers are used to knead the muscles of the body and to squeeze them to prepare them for the other Swedish massage techniques that follow.

3. Tapotement or Rhythmic Tapping

This technique of Swedish massage, as the name suggests consists of rhythmic tapping that uses the fists of the cupped hands. This helps to loosen and relax the muscles being manipulated and also helps to energize them. The sides of the hands are used in this massage technique.

4. Friction

This move seeks to create heat to bring about relaxation of the muscles. The palms of the hand are rubbed together vigorously with each other, or they are rubbed onto the skin of the person being massaged in order to produce heat by friction. This technique can be used as a warm up for the muscles of the body to be treated for deeper massage.

5. Vibration or Shaking

This is the one among Swedish massage techniques that helps to loosen up the muscles by using a back and forth action of the fingertips or the heel of the hand over the skin. The muscles of the body are literally shaken up to loosen and relax the muscles. The sides of the hand, and any part of the hand such as the tips or heel can be used by the masseuse to shake up the muscles of the person.

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

Manual lymphatic drainage massage. Therapeutic Pain Relief Therapy, Santa Barbara, Goleta Ca. Nicola, LMT 805-637-7482

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

The Lymph System

Female lymphatic Male Lymphatic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most people are familiar with the body’s vessel system that carries blood to and from the tissues, but few understand there is another equally vital system of vessels that removes cell wastes, proteins, excess fluid, viruses, and bacteria. The lymph system picks up fluids and waste products from the spaces between the cells and then filters and cleans them.

Like the roots of a tree, the lymph system starts as tiny vessels–only a single-cell wide–that eventually branch into larger and larger tubes that carry these fluids back to the blood stream. This network of delicate vessels and lymph nodes is the primary structure of the immune system. The lymph nodes act as check points along the pathways of the vessels. They filter the fluid (called lymph) and serve as the home for lymphocytes–little Pac Man-like cells that attack and destroy foreign bacteria and viruses and even abnormal cells, like cancer cells.

When the lymph system works well, we feel healthy and have a strong defense against illness. When it’s sluggish or blocked–say after surgery or an injury–we can have swelling, feel tired, and be more susceptible to colds and infections.




Benefits of manual lymphatic drainage massage


A customized form of bodywork, lymphatic massage may help the lymph system do its job better. By understanding the anatomy and function of this delicate system, your massage therapist can assist your body in clearing sluggish tissues of waste and swelling.

Though lymph vessels are found throughout the body, most of them–about 70 percent–are located just below the skin. These fragile vessels work to pick up fluids between the cell spaces when gentle pressure is applied to them from increased fluid build-up, muscle contractions, or the pressure of a therapist’s hands. By using very light pressures in a rhythmic, circular motion, a massage therapist can stimulate the lymph system to work more efficiently and help it move the lymph fluids back to the heart.

Furthermore, by freeing vessel pathways, lymphatic massage can help retrain the lymph system to work better for more long-term health benefits.

Massage therapists versed in lymphatic drainage therapy, an advanced form of lymphatic massage, can identify the rhythm, direction, and quality of the lymphatic flow and remap drainage pathways.

 

LymphaticSystem_Female


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Should Get It?


Lymph massage can benefit just about everyone. If you’re feeling tired and low on energy, or if you’ve been sick and feeling like your body is fighting to get back on track, lymph massage would likely serve you well.

In addition, athletes, surgical patients, fibromyaliga and chronic fatigue sufferers, as well as those wanting a fresh look may want to consider lymphatic massage. Here’s why.

After a sports injury or surgery, lymph vessels can become overwhelmed with the demand placed on them. When tissues are swollen, deep tissue techniques may actually cause damage to the lymph vessels and surrounding structures. Lymphatic massage is often the treatment of choice, because it helps the body remove proteins and waste products from the affected area and reduce the swelling. This helps reduce pressure on cells and allows them to reproduce faster to heal the body.

Surgical procedures involving lymph node removal–such as breast cancer surgery–can cause limbs to swell. Severe limb swelling needs the attention of a medical team, but in milder cases, lymphatic massage alone may be enough to prevent or even treat the swelling. It’s important that your doctor be involved in your care. Let your doctor know you’d like to see a massage therapist and make sure you have medical approval.

Lymph massage can also be part of a care program for fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome. Because it’s so gentle, it is well tolerated by these patients, who are often experiencing sore trigger points throughout the body. And by encouraging lymph flow and removing waste products, this gentle form of bodywork can help restore immune function and improve vitality.

Estheticians are trained in a very specific form of lymphatic massage. When you get a facial, your esthetician will gently massage your face to help improve lymph flow. When lymph is moving freely in the face, you’ll have clearer, healthier skin without a buildup of toxins and fluids.

So, if you’re feeling a bit sluggish, experiencing mild to moderate swelling, recovering from a sports injury, or interested in optimizing your lymph system for stronger immunity, ask your massage therapist about lymphatic massage. It can have a powerful impact on your body’s ability to heal.

Lymph_chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

lymphatic-system

Manual lymphatic drainage

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Manual lymphatic drainage
(MLD) is a type of gentle massage which is intended to encourage the natural drainage of the lymph, which carries waste products away from the tissues back toward the heart. The lymph system depends on intrinsic contractions of the smooth muscle cells in the walls of lymph vessels (peristalsis) and the movement of skeletal muscles to propel lymph through the vessels to lymph nodes and then beyond the lymph nodes to the lymph ducts which return lymph to the cardiovascular system. Manual lymph drainage uses a specific amount of pressure (less than 9 ounces per square inch or about 4 kPa) and rhythmic circular movements to stimulate lymph flow.[1][2]

History

Manual lymphatic drainage was pioneered by Danish Drs. Emil Vodder and Estrid Vodder in the 1930s[2] for the treatment of chronic sinusitis and other immune disorders. While working on the French Riviera treating patients with chronic colds, the Vodders noticed these patients had swollen lymph nodes. In the 1930s, it was considered taboo to tamper with the lymphatic system due to the medical profession’s poor understanding of this system. The Vodders were not deterred by this and, in 1932, began to study the lymph system, developing light, rhythmic hand movements to promote lymph movement. In 1936, they introduced this technique in Paris, France, and after World War II, they returned to Copenhagen to teach other practitioners to use this therapy.[3]

Recognition

MLD is now recognized as a primary tool in lymphedema management. Therapists can today receive certification through special classes conducted by various organizations specializing in MLD, or through a complete lymphedema treatment certification course.[4] Scientific studies show mixed results regarding the efficacy of the method in treating lymphedema and further studies are needed.[5] A 2009 meta-analysis of studies in the area of sports medicine and rehabilitation showed best evidence of effectiveness for Manual lymphatic drainage treatment to “enzyme serum levels associated with acute skeletal muscle cell damage as well as reduction of edema [swelling] around broken bones.” [6] A 2013 systematic review of manual lymphatic drainage with regard to breast cancer related lymphedema found no clear support for the effectiveness of the intervention in either preventing limb edema in at-risk women or treating women for the condition.[7]

scalp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

TMJ TMJ syndrome Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Massage, TMJ Trigger Point Images, ,Therapeutic Pain Relief Therapy, Santa Barbara, Goleta Ca. Massage Therapist, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482

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Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

What is TMJ TMJ syndrome Temporomandibular joint dysfunction? 

TMJTMJ

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: LINK=Temporomandibular joint dysfunction

Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD or TMJD), also known as temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome and temporomandibular disorder among others, is an umbrella term covering pain and dysfunction of the muscles of mastication (the muscles that move the jaw) and the temporomandibular joints (the joints which connect the mandible to the skull). The most important feature is pain, followed by restricted mandibular movement,[1] and noises from the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) during jaw movement. Although TMD is not life-threatening, it can be detrimental to quality of life,[2] because the symptoms can become chronic and difficult to manage. About 20% to 30% of the adult population are affected to some degree.[3] Usually people affected by TMD are between 20 and 40 years of age,[2] and it is more common in females than males.[4] TMD is the second most frequent cause of orofacial pain after dental pain (i.e. toothache).[5]

TMD is a symptom complex rather than a single condition, and it is thought to be caused by multiple factors.[6][7] However, these factors are poorly understood,[8] and there is disagreement as to their relative importance. There are many treatments available,[3] although there is a general lack of evidence for any treatment in TMD, and no widely accepted treatment protocol exists. Common treatments that are used include provision of occlusal splints, psychosocial interventions like cognitive behavioral therapy, and medications like analgesics (pain killers) or others. Most sources now agree that no irreversible treatment should be carried out for TMD.[9]

Classification

TMD is considered by some to be one of the 4 major symptom complexes in chronic orofacial pain, along with burning mouth syndrome, atypical facial pain and atypical odontalgia.[11] TMD has been considered as a type of musculoskeletal,[12] neuromuscular,[13] or rheumatological disorder.[12] It has also been called a functional pain syndrome,[8] and a psychogenic disorder.[14] Others consider TMD a “central sensitivity syndrome”, in reference to evidence that TMD might be caused by a centrally mediated sensitivity to pain.[15] It is hypothesized that there is a great deal of similarity between TMD and other pain syndromes like fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, interstitial cystitis, headache, chronic lower back pain and chronic neck pain. These disorders have also been theorized to be caused by centrally mediated sensitivity to pain, and furthermore they often occur together.[15]

Definitions and terminology

Frequently, TMD has been treated as a single syndrome, but the prevailing modern view is that TMD is a cluster of related disorders  with many common features.[12] Indeed, some have suggested that in the future the term TMD may be discarded as the different causes are fully identified and separated into different conditions.[14] Sometimes, “temporomandibular joint dysfunction” is described as the most common form of temporomandibular disorder,[6] whereas many other sources use the term temporomandibular disorder synonymously, or instead of the term temporomandibular joint dysfunction. In turn, the term temporomandibular disorder is described as “a clinical term [referring to] musculoskeletal disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints and their associated musculature . It is a collective term which represents a diverse group of pathologies involving the temporomandibular joint, the muscles of mastication, or both”.[1] Another definition of temporomandibular disorders is “a group of conditions with similar signs and symptoms that affect the termporomandibular joints, the muscles of mastication, or both.”[16] Temporomandibular disorder is a term that creates confusion since it refers to a group of similarly symptomatic conditions, whilst many sources use the term temporomandibular disorders as a vague description rather than a specific syndrome, and refer to any condition which may affect the temporomandibular joints (see table). The temporomandibular joint is susceptible to a huge range of diseases , some rarer than others, and there is no implication that all of these will cause any symptoms or limitation in function at all.

The preferred terms in medical publications is to an extent influenced by geographic location, e.g. in the United Kingdom, the term “pain dysfunction syndrome” is in common use, and in other countries different terms are used.[6] In the United States, the term “temporomandibular disorder” is generally favored. The American Academy of Orofacial Pain uses temporomandibular disorder, whilst the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research uses temporomandibular joint disorder.[17] A more complete list of synonyms for this topic is extensive, with some being more commonly used than others. In addition to those already mentioned, examples include “temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome”, “temporomandibular pain dysfunction syndrome”, “temporomandibular joint syndrome”, “temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome”, “temporomandibular dysfunction”, “temporomandibular disorder”, “temporomandibular syndrome”, “facial arthromyalgia”, “myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome”, “craniomandibular dysfunction”, “myofacial pain dysfunction”, “masticatory myalgia”, “mandibular dysfunction”, and “Costen’s syndrome”.

The lack of standardization in terms is not restricted to medical papers. Notable internationally recognized sources vary in both their preferred term, and their offered definition, e.g.

“Temporomandibular Pain and Dysfunction Syndrome – Aching in the muscles of mastication, sometimes with an occasional brief severe pain on chewing, often associated with restricted jaw movement and clicking or popping sounds.” (Classification of Chronic Pain, International Association for the Study of Pain).[18]

“Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint disorder.” (International Classification of Headache Disorders 2nd edition (ICHD-2), International Headache Society).[19]

“Temporomandibular joint-pain-dysfunction syndrome” listed in turn under “Temporomandibular joint disorders” (International Classification of Diseases 10th revision, World Health Organization).[20]

In this article, the term temporomandibular disorder is taken to mean any disorder than affects the temporomandibular joint, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction (here also abbreviated to TMD) is taken to mean symptomatic (e.g. pain, limitation of movement, clicking)  dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint, however there is no single, globally accepted term or definition[17] concerning this topic

By cause and symptoms

It has been suggested that TMD may develop following trauma, particularly whiplash injury , although the evidence for this is not conclusive. This type of TMD is sometimes termed “posttraumatic TMD” (pTMD) to distinguish it from TMD of unknown cause, sometimes termed “idiopathic TMD” (iTMD).[12] Sometimes muscle-related (myogenous) TMD (also termed myogenous TMD, or TMD secondary to myofascial pain and dysfunction) is distinguished from joint-related TMD (also termed arthogenous TMD, or TMD secondary to true articular disease), based upon whether the muscles of mastication or the TMJs themselves are predominantly involved. This classification, which effectively divides TMD into 2 syndromes, is followed by the American Academy of Orofacial Pain.[17] However, since most people with TMD could be placed into both of these groups, which makes a single diagnosis difficult when this classification is used. The Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD) allows for multiple diagnoses in an attempt to overcome the problems with other classifications. RDC/TMD considers temporomandibular disorders in 2 axes; axis I is the physical aspects, and axis II involves assessment of psychological status, mandibular function and TMD-related psychosocial disability. [17] Axis I is further divided into 3 general groups. Group I are muscle disorders, group II are disc displacements and group III are joint disorders,[5] although it is common for people with TMD to fit into more than one of these groups.

By duration

Sometimes distinction is made between acute TMD, where symptoms last for less than 3 months, and chronic TMD, where symptoms last for more than 3 months.[1] Not much is known about acute TMD since these individuals do not typically attend in secondary care (hospital).[1]

Signs and symptoms

Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder vary in their presentation. The symptoms will usually involve more than one of the various components of the masticatory system, muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, bones, connective tissue, and/or the teeth .[21]

The three classically described, cardinal signs and symptoms of TMD are :[5][22]

Other signs and symptoms have also been described, although these are less common and less significant than the cardinal signs and symptoms listed above. Examples include:

Causes

TMD is a symptom complex (i.e. a group of symptoms occurring together and characterizing a particular disease), which is thought to be caused by multiple, poorly understood factors,[6][7][8] but the exact etiology is unknown.[25] There are factors which appear to predispose to TMD (genetic, hormonal, anatomical), factors which may precipitate it (trauma, occlusal changes, parafunction), and also factors which may prolong it (stress and again parafunction).[16] Overall, two hypotheses have dominated research into the causes of TMD, namely a psychosocial model and a theory of occlusal dysharmony.[25] Interest in occlusal factors as a causative factor in TMD was especially widespread in the past, and the theory has since fallen out of favor and become controversial due to lack of evidence.

Disc displacement

pterygoids

In people with TMD, it has been shown that the lower head of lateral pterygoid contracts during mouth closing (when it should relax), and is often tender to palpation.  To theorize upon this observation, some have suggested that due to a tear in the back of the joint capsule, the articular disc may be displaced forwards (anterior disc displacement), stopping the upper head of lateral pterygoid from acting to stabilize the disc as it would do normally. As a biologic compensatory mechanism, the lower head tries to fill this role, hence the abnormal muscle activity during mouth closure. There is some evidence that anterior disc displacement is present in proportion of TMD cases.  Anterior disc displacement with reduction refers to abnormal forward movement of the disc during opening which reduces upon closing. Anterior disc displacement without reduction refers to an abnormal forward, bunched-up position of the articular disc which does not reduce. In this latter scenario, the disc is not intermediary between the condyle and the articular fossa as it should be, and hence the articular surfaces of the bones themselves are exposed to a greater degree of wear (which may predispose to osteoarthritis in later life).[7]

Degenerative joint disease

The general term “degenerative joint disease” refers to arthritis (both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis) and arthrosis. The term arthrosis may cause confusion since in the specialized TMD literature it means something slightly different from in the wider medical literature. In medicine generally, arthrosis can be a nonspecific term for a joint, any disease of a joint (or specifically degenerative joint disease), and is also used as a synonym for osteoarthritis.[26] In the specialized literature that has evolved around TMD research, arthrosis is differentiated from arthritis by the presence of low and no inflammation respectively.[8] Both are however equally degenerative.[8] The TMJs are sometimes described as one of the most used joints in the body. Over time, either with normal use or with parafunctional use of the joint, wear and degeneration can occur, termed osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune joint disease, can also affect the TMJs.  Degenerative joint diseases may lead to defects in the shape of the tissues of the joint, limitation of function (e.g. restricted mandibular movements), and joint pain.[8]

Psychosocial factors

Emotional stress (anxiety, depression, anger) may increase pain by causing autonomic, visceral and skeletal activity and by reduced inhibition via the descending pathways of the limbic system. The interactions of these biological systems have been described as a vicious “anxiety-pain-tension” cycle which is thought to be frequently involved in TMD. Put simply, stress and anxiety cause grinding of teeth and sustained muscular contraction in the face. This produces pain which causes further anxiety which in turn causes prolonged muscular spasm at trigger points, vasoconstriction, ischemia and release of pain mediators. The pain discourages use of the masticatory system (a similar phenomenon in other chronic pain conditions is termed “fear avoidance” behavior), which leads to reduced muscle flexibility, tone, strength and endurance. This manifests as limited mouth opening and a sensation that the teeth are not fitting properly.[11] 

Persons with TMD have a higher prevalence of psychological disorders than people without TMD.[27] People with TMD have been shown to have higher levels of anxiety, depression, somatization and sleep deprivation, and these could be considered important risk factors for the development of TMD.[7][27] In the 6 months before the onset, 50–70% of people with TMD report experiencing stressful life events (e.g. involving work, money, health or relationship loss). It has been postulated that such events induce anxiety and cause increased jaw muscle activity. Muscular hyperactivity has also been shown in people with TMD whilst taking examinations or watching horror films.[7]

Others argue that a link between muscular hyperactivity and TMD has not been convincingly demonstrated, and that emotional distress may be more of a consequence of pain rather than a cause.[25]

Bruxism

Main article: Bruxism

Bruxism is an oral parafunctional activity where there is excessive clenching and grinding of the teeth.  It can occur during sleep or whilst awake. The cause of bruxism itself is not completely understood, but psychosocial factors appear to be implicated in awake bruxism and dopaminergic dysfunction and other central nervous system mechanisms may be involved in sleep bruxism. If TMD pain and limitation of mandibular movement are greatest upon waking, and then slowly resolve throughout the day, this may indicate sleep bruxism. Conversely, awake bruxism tends to cause symptoms that slowly get worse throughout the day, and there may be no pain at all upon waking.

The relationship of bruxism with TMD is debated. Many suggest that sleep bruxism can be a causative or contributory factor to pain symptoms in TMD.[7][25][28][29] Indeed, the symptoms of TMD overlap with those of bruxism .[30] Others suggest that there is no strong association between TMD and bruxism.[23] A systematic review investigating the possible relationship concluded that when self-reported bruxism is used to diagnose bruxism, there is a positive association with TMD pain, and when more strict diagnostic criteria for bruxism are used, the association with TMD symptoms is much lower.[31] Self-reported bruxism is probably a poor method of identifying bruxism.[29] There are also very many people who grind their teeth and who do not develop TMD.[16] Bruxism and other parafunctional activities may play a role in perpetuating symptoms in some cases.[32]

Other parafunctional habits such as pen chewing, lip and cheek biting  (which may manifest as morsicatio buccarum and/or linea alba), are also suggested to contribute to the development of TMD.[7] Other parafunctional activities might include jaw thrusting, excessive gum chewing, nail biting and eating very hard foods.

Trauma

Trauma, both micro and macrotrauma, is sometimes identified as a possible cause of TMD, however the evidence is not strong.[23] Prolonged mouth opening (hyper-extension) is also suggested as a possible cause. It is thought that this leads to microtrauma and subsequent muscular hyperactivity. This may occur during dental treatment, with oral intubation whilst under a general anesthetic, during singing or wind instrument practice (really these can be thought of as parafunctional activities).[7] Damage may be incurred during violent yawning, laughing, road traffic accidents, sports injuries, interpersonal violence, or during dental treatment,[23] (such as tooth extraction). [7]

It has been proposed that a link exists between whiplash injuries (sudden neck hyper-extension usually occurring in road traffic accidents), and the development of TMD. This has been termed “post-traumatic TMD” , to separate it from “idiopathic TMD”.[12] Despite multiple studies having been performed over the years, the cumulative evidence has been described as conflicting, with moderate evidence that TMD can occasionally follow whiplash injury.[12] The research that suggests a link appears to demonstrate a low to moderate incidence of TMD following whiplash injury, and that pTMD has a poorer response to treatment than TMD which has not developed in relation to trauma.[12]

Occlusal factors

Occlusal factors as an etiologic factor in TMD is a controversial topic.[7] Abnormalities of occlusion (problems with the bite) are often blamed for TMD but there is no evidence that these factors are involved. [23] Occlusal abnormalities are incredibly common, and most people with occlusal abnormalities do not have TMD.[33] Although occlusal features may affect observed electrical activity in masticatory muscles,[34] there are no statistically significant differences in the number of occlusal abnormalities in people with TMD and in people without TMD.[7] There is also no evidence for a causal link between orthodontic treatment and TMD.[7] The modern, mainstream view is that the vast majority of people with TMD, occlusal factors are not related.[16] Theories of occlusal factors in TMD are largely of historical interest. A causal relationship between occlusal factors and TMD was championed by Ramfjord in the 1960s.[14] A small minority of dentists continue to prescribe occlusal adjustments in the belief that this will prevent or treat TMD despite the existence of systematic reviews of the subject which state that there is no evidence for such practices,[35] and the vast majority of opinion being that no irreversible treatment should be carried out in TMD (see Occlusal adjustment).

Genetic factors

TMD does not obviously run in families like a genetic disease. It has been suggested that a genetic predisposition for developing TMD (and chronic pain syndromes generally) could exist. This has be postulated to be explained by variations of the gene which codes for the enzyme catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) which may produce 3 different phenotypes with regards pain sensitivity. COMT (together with monoamine oxidase) is involved in breaking down catecholamines (e.g. dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine). The variation of the COMT gene which produces less of this enzyme is associated with a high sensitivity to pain. Females with this variation, are at 2–3 times greater risk of developing TMD than females without this variant. However this theory is controversial since there is conflicting evidence.[8]

Hormonal factors

Since females are more often affected by TMD than males, the female sex hormone estrogen has been suggested to be involved.[8] The results of one study suggested that the periods of highest pain in TMD can be correlated with rapid periods of change in the circulating estrogen level. Low estrogen was also correlated to higher pain. [14] In the menstrual cycle, estrogen levels fluctuate rapidly during ovulation, and also rapidly increases just before menstruation and rapidly decreases during menstruation. Post-menopausal females who are treated with hormone replacement therapy are more likely to develop TMD, or may experience an exacerbation if they already had TMD. Several possible mechanisms by which estrogen might be involved in TMD symptoms have been proposed. Estrogen may play a role in modulating joint inflammation, nociceptive neurons in the trigeminal nerve, muscle reflexes to pain and μ-opioid receptors.[8]

Possible associations

TMD has been suggested to be associated with other conditions or factors, with varying degrees evidence and some more commonly than others. E.g. It has been shown that 75% of people with TMD could also be diagnosed with fibromyalgia, since they met the diagnostic criteria, and that conversely, 18% of people with fibromyalgia met diagnostic criteria for TMD.[15 ] A possible link between many of these chronic pain conditions has been hypothesized to be due to shared pathophysiological mechanisms, and they have been collectively termed “central sensitivity syndromes”,[15] although other apparent associations cannot be explained in this manner.

Pathophysiology

Left temporomandibular joint, lateral view.
Left TMJ, medial view, showing sphenomandibular and stylomandibular ligaments.
Sagittal TMJ cross-section showing articular eminence, articular disc, and upper and lower joint spaces.

Anatomy and physiology

Temporomandibular joints

The temporomandibular joints are the dual articulation of the mandible with the skull. Each TMJ is classed as a “ginglymoarthrodial” joint since it is both a ginglymus (hinging joint) and an arthrodial (sliding) joint,[37] and involves the condylar process of the mandible below, and the articular fossa (or glenoid fossa) of the temporal bone above. Between these articular surfaces is the articular disc (or meniscus), which is a biconcave, transversely oval disc composed of dense fibrous connective tissue. Each TMJ is covered by a fibrous capsule. There are tight fibers connecting the mandible to the disc, and loose fibers which connect the disc to the temporal bone, meaning there are in effect 2 joint capsules, creating an upper joint space and a lower joint space, with the articular disc in between. The synovial membrane of the TMJ lines the inside of the fibrous capsule apart from the articular surfaces and the disc. This membrane secretes synovial fluid, which is both a lubricant to fill the joint spaces, and a means to convey nutrients to the tissues inside the joint. Behind the disc is loose vascular tissue termed the “bilaminar region” which serves as a posterior attachment for the disc and also fills with blood to fill the space created when the head of the condyle translates down the articular eminence.[38] Due to its concave shape, sometimes the articular disc is described as having an anterior band, intermediate zone and a posterior band.[39] When the mouth is opened, the initial movement of the mandibular condyle is rotational, and this involves mainly the lower joint space, and when the mouth is opened further, the movement of the condyle is translational, involving mainly the upper joint space.[40] This translation movement is achieved by the condylar head sliding down the articular eminence, which constitutes the front border of the articular fossa.[33] The function of the articular eminence is to limit the forwards movement of the condyle.[33] The ligament directly associated with the TMJ is the temporomandibular ligament, also termed the lateral ligament, which really is a thickening of the lateral aspect of the fibrous capsule.[33] The stylomandibular ligament and the sphenomandibular ligament are not directly associated with the joint capsule. Together, these ligaments act to restrict the extreme movements of the joint.[41]

Muscles of mastication

The muscles of mastication are paired on each side and work together to produce the movements of the mandible. The main muscles involved are the masseter, temporalis and medial and lateral pterygoid muscles.

They can be thought of in terms of the directions they move the mandible, with most being involved in more than one type of movement due to the variation in the orientation of muscle fibers within some of these muscles.

Each lateral pterygoid muscle is composed of 2 heads, the upper or superior head and the lower or inferior head. The lower head originates from the lateral surface of the lateral pterygoid plate and inserts at a depression on the neck of mandibular condyle, just below the articular surface, termed the pterygoid fovea. The upper head originates from the infratemporal surface and the infratemporal crest of the greater wing of the sphenoid bone. The upper head also inserts at the fovea, but a part may be attached directly to the joint capsule and to the anterior and medial borders of the articular disc.[38] The 2 parts of lateral pterygoid have different actions. The lower head contracts during mouth opening, and the upper head contracts during mouth closing. The function of the lower head is to steady the articular disc as it moves back with the condyle into the articular fossa. It is relaxed during mouth closure.[7]

Mechanisms of main signs and symptoms

Joint noises

Noises from the TMJs are a symptom of dysfunction of these joints. The sounds commonly produced by TMD are usually described as a “click” or a “pop” when a single sound is heard and as “crepitation” or “crepitus” when there are multiple, grating, rough sounds. Most joint sounds are due to internal derangement of the joint, which is a term used to describe instability or abnormal position of the articular disc.[42] Clicking often accompanies either jaw opening or closing, and usually occurs towards the end of the movement. The noise indicates that the articular disc has suddenly moved to and from a temporarily displaced position (disk displacement with reduction) to allow completion of a phase of movement of the mandible.[7][25] If the disc displaces and does not reduce (move back into position) this may be associated with locking. Clicking alone is not diagnostic of TMD since it is present in high proportion of the general population, mostly in people who have no pain.[7] Crepitus often indicates arthritic changes in the joint, and may occur at any time during mandibular movement, especially lateral movements.[7] Perforation of the disc may also cause crepitus.[33] Due to the proximity of the TMJ to the ear canal, joint noises are perceived to be much louder to the individual than to others. Often people with TMD are surprised that what sounds to them like very loud noises cannot be heard at all by others next to them. However, it is occasionally possible for loud joint noises to be easily heard by others in some cases and this can be a source of embarrassment e.g. when eating in company.

Pain

Pain symptoms in TMD can be thought of as originating from the joint (arthralgia), or from the muscles (myofascial), or both. There is a poor correlation between TMD pain severity and evidence of tissue pathology.[8]

Arthralgia

Generally, degenerative joint changes are associated with greater pain.

Myofascial pain

Pain originating from the muscles of mastication as a result of abnormal muscular function or hyperactivity. The muscular pain is frequently, but not always, associated with daytime clenching or nocturnal bruxism.[43]

Referred TMD pain

Sometimes TMD pain can radiate or be referred from its cause (i.e. the TMJ and/or the muscles of mastication) and be felt as headaches, earache or toothache.[10]

Due to the proximity of the ear to the temporomandibular joint, TMJ pain can often be confused with ear pain.[21] The pain may be referred in around half of all patients and experienced as otalgia (earache).[44] Conversely, TMD is an important possible cause of secondary otalgia. Treatment of TMD may then significantly reduce symptoms of otalgia and tinnitus, as well as atypical facial pain.[45] Despite some of these findings, some researchers question whether TMJD therapy can reduce symptoms in the ear, and there is currently an ongoing debate to settle the controversy.[21]

Limitation of mandibular movement

The jaw deviates to the affected side during opening,[18] and restricted mouth opening usually signifies that both TMJs are involved, but severe trismus rarely occurs. If the greatest reduction in movement occurs upon waking then this may indicate that there is concomitant sleep bruxism. In other cases the limitation in movement gets worse throughout the day.[7]

The jaw may lock entirely.[7]

Limitation of mandibular movement itself may lead to further problems involving the TMJs and the muscles of mastication. Changes in the synovial membrane may lead to a reduction in lubrication of the joint and contribute to degenerative joint changes.[46] The muscles become weak, and fibrosis may occur. All these factors may lead to a further limitation of jaw movement and increase in pain.[46]

Degenerative joint disease, such as osteoarthritis or organic degeneration of the articular surfaces, recurrent fibrous and/or bony ankylosis, developmental abnormality, or pathologic lesions within the TMJ. Myofascial pain syndrome.[medical citation needed]

Diagnosis

RDC/TMD criteria, axis I diagnoses.[5]
Group I: muscle disordersIa. Myofascial pain:

  • Report of pain or ache in the jaw, temples, face, preauricular area, or inside the ear at rest or during function;
  • Pain reported by the subject in response to palpation of 3 of the following muscle sites (right side and left side count as a separate sites for each muscle): posterior temporalis, middle temporalis, anterior temporalis, origin of masseter, insertion of masseter, posterior mandibular region, submandibular region, lateral pterygoid area, and tendon of the temporalis;
  • At least one of the painful sites must be on the same side as the complaint of pain.

Ib. Myofascial pain with limited opening:

  • Myofascial pain as defined in Ia;
  • Pain-free unassisted mandibular opening 40 mm;
  • Maximum assisted opening (passive stretch) 5 mm greater than pain-free unassisted opening.

Group II: disc displacements

IIa. Disc displacement with reduction:

  • Reciprocal clicking in TMJ (click on both vertical opening and closing that occurs at point 5 mm greater interincisal distance on opening than closing and is eliminated on protrusive opening), reproducible on 2 out of 3 consecutive trials; or
  • Clicking in TMJ on both vertical range of motion (either opening or closing), reproducible on 2 out of 3 consecutive trials, and click during lateral excursion or protrusion, reproducible on 2 out of 3 consecutive trials.

IIb. Disc displacement without reduction with limited opening:

  • History of significant limitation in opening;
  • Maximum unassisted opening 35 mm;
  • Passive stretch increases opening by 4 mm over maximum unassisted opening;
  • Contralateral excursion 7 mm and/or uncorrected deviation to ipsilateral side on opening;
  • Absence of joint sound or presence of joint sounds not meeting criteria for disc displacement with reduction.

IIc. Disc displacement without reduction, without limited opening:

  • History of significant limitation of mandibular opening;
  • Maximum unassisted opening 35 mm;
  • Passive stretch increases opening by 5 mm over maximum unassisted opening;
  • Contralateral excursion 7 mm;
  • Presence of joint sounds not meeting criteria for disc displacement with reduction;
  • In those studies allowing images, imaging conducted by either arthrography or magnetic resonance reveals disc displacement without reduction.

Group III: arthralgia, osteoarthritis, osteoarthrosis

IIIa. Arthralgia:

  • Pain in one or both joint sites (lateral pole and/or posterior attachment) during palpation;
  • One or more of the following self-reports of pain: pain in the region of the joint, pain in the joint during maximum unassisted opening, pain in the joint during assisted opening, and pain in the joint during lateral excursion;
  • For a diagnoses of simple arthralgia, coarse crepitus must be absent.

IIIb. Osteoarthritis of the TMJ:

  • Arthralgia as defined in IIIa;
  • Either coarse crepitus in the joint or radiologic signs of arthrosis.

IIIc. Osteoarthrosis of the TMJ:

  • Absence of all signs of arthralgia;
  • Either coarse crepitus in the joint or radiologic signs of arthrosis

Modern digitalised panoramic X-ray devices are capable to take TMJ images, which provides information about articular fossa and condyle.
Dynamics of temporomandibular joint during voluntary mouth opening and closing visualized by real-time MRI.[47]

Pain is the most common reason for people with TMD to seek medical advice.[1] Joint noises may require auscultation with a stethoscope to detect.[18] Clicks of the joint may also be palpated, over the joint itself in the preauricular region, or via a finger inserted in the external acoustic meatus,[16] which lies directly behind the TMJ. The differential diagnosis is with degenerative joint disease (e.g. osteoarthritis), rheumatoid arthritis, temporal arteritis, otitis media, parotitis, mandibular osteomyelitis, Eagle syndrome, trigeminal neuralgia,[medical citation needed] oromandibular dystonia,[medical citation needed] deafferentation pains, and psychogenic pain.[18]

Diagnostic criteria

Various diagnostic systems have been described. Some consider the Research Diagnostic Criteria method the gold standard.[16] Abbreviated to “RDC/TMD”, this was first introduced in 1992 by Dworkin and LeResche in an attempt to classify temporomandibular disorders by etiology and apply universal standards for research into TMD.[48] This method involves 2 diagnostic axes, namely axis I, the physical diagnosis, and axis II, the psychologic diagnosis.[16] Axis I contains 3 different groups which can occur in combinations of 2 or all 3 groups,[16] (see table).

McNeill 1997 described TMD diagnostic criteria as follows:[1]

The International Headache Society’s diagnostic criteria for “headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint disorder” is similar to the above:[19]

Management

TMD can be difficult to manage, and since the disorder transcends the boundaries between several health-care disciplines — in particular, dentistry and neurology, the treatment may often involve multiple approaches and be multidisciplinary.[41] Most who are involved in treating and, researching TMD now agree that any treatment carried out should not permanently alter the jaw or teeth, and should be reversible.[9][13] To avoid permanent change, over-the-counter or prescription pain medications may be prescribed.[49]

Psychosocial and behavioral interventions

Given the important role that psychosocial factors appear to play in TMD, psychosocial interventions could be viewed to be central to management of the condition.[27] There is a suggestion that treatment of factors that modulate pain sensitivity such as mood disorders, anxiety and fatigue, may be important in the treatment of TMD, which often tends to attempt to address the pain directly.[27]

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has been used in TMD and has been shown to be efficacious by meta analyses.[50]

Hypnosis is suggested by some to be appropriate for TMD. Studies have suggested that it may even be more beneficial than occlusal splint therapy, and has comparable effects to relaxation techniques.[27]

Relaxation techniques include progressive muscle relaxation, yoga, and meditation.[27] It has been suggested that TMD involves increased sensitivity to external stimuli leading to an increased sympathetic (“fight or flight”) response with cardiovascular and respiratory alterations.[27] Relaxation techniques cause reduced sympathetic activity, including muscle relaxation and reducing sensitivity to external stimuli, and provoke a general sense of well being and reduced anxiety.[27]

Devices

A lower, full coverage occlusal splint.

An upper, full coverage occlusal splint.

Occlusal splints (also termed bite plates or intra-oral appliances) are often used by dentists to treat TMD. They are usually made of acrylic and can be hard or soft. They can be designed to fit onto the upper teeth or the lower teeth. They may cover all the teeth in one arch (full coverage splint) or only some (partial coverage splint). Splints are also termed according to their intended mechanism, such as the anterior positioning splint or the stabilization splint.[16] Although occlusal splints are generally considered a reversible treatment,[46] sometimes partial coverage splints lead to pathologic tooth migration (changes in the position of teeth). Normally splints are only worn during sleep, and therefore probably do nothing for people who engage in parafunctional activities during wakefulness rather than during sleep. There is slightly more evidence for the use of occlusal splints in sleep bruxism than in TMD. At the least, they will mechanically protect the teeth from pathologic tooth wear associated with bruxism. A splint can also have a diagnostic role if it demonstrates excessive occlusal wear after a period of wearing it each night. This may confirm the presence of sleep bruxism if it was in doubt. Soft splints are occasionally reported to worsen discomfort related to TMD.[16] Specific types of occlusal splint are discussed below.

A stabilization splint is a hard acrylic splint that forces the teeth to meet in an “ideal” relationship for the muscles of mastication and the TMJs. It is claimed that this technique reduces abnormal muscular activity and promotes “neuromuscular balance”. A stabilization splint is only intended to be used for about 2–3 months.[6] It is more complicated to construct than other types of splint since a face bow record is required and significantly more skill on the part of the dental technician. This kind of splint should be properly fitted to avoid exacerbating the problem and used for brief periods of time. The use of the splint should be discontinued if it is painful or increases existing pain.[49] A systematic review of all the scientific studies investigating the efficacy of stabilization splints concluded the following:

“On the basis of our analysis we conclude that the literature seems to suggest that there is insufficient evidence either for or against the use of stabilization splint therapy over other active interventions for the treatment of TMD. However, there is weak evidence to suggest that the use of stabilization splints for the treatment of TMD may be beneficial for reducing pain severity, at rest and on palpation, when compared to no treatment”.[6]

Partial coverage splints are recommended by some experts, but they have the potential to cause unwanted tooth movements, which can occasionally be severe. The mechanism of this tooth movement is that the splint effectively holds some teeth out of contact and puts all the force of the bite onto the teeth which the splint covers. This can cause the covered teeth to be intruded, and those that are not covered to over-erupted. I.e. a partial coverage splint can act as a Dahl appliance. Examples of partial coverage splints include the NTI-TSS (“nociceptive trigeminal inhibitor tension suppression system”), which covers the upper front teeth only. Due to the risks involved with long term use, some discourage the use of any type of partial coverage splint.[16]

An anterior positioning splint is a splint that designed to promote an anteriorly displaced disc. It is rarely used.[16] A 2010 review of all the scientific studies carried out to investigate the use of occlusal splints in TMD concluded:

“Hard stabilization appliances, when adjusted properly, have good evidence of modest efficacy in the treatment of TMD pain compared to non-occluding appliances and no treatment. Other types of appliances, including soft stabilization appliances, anterior positioning appliances, and anterior bite appliances, have some RCT evidence of efficacy in reducing TMD pain. However, the potential for adverse events with these appliances is higher and suggests the need for close monitoring in their use.”[51]

Ear canal inserts are also available, but no published peer-reviewed clinical trials have shown them to be useful.

Medication

Medication is the main method of managing pain in TMD, mostly because there is little if any evidence of the effectiveness of surgical or dental interventions. Many drugs have been used to treat TMD pain, such as analgesics (pain killers), benzodiazepines (e.g. clonazepam, prazepam, diazepam), anticonvulsants (e.g. gabapentin), muscle relaxants (e.g. cyclobenzaprine), and others. Analgesics that have been studied in TMD include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. piroxicam, diclofenac, naproxen) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors (e.g. celecoxib). Topical methyl salicylate and topical capsaicin have also been used. Other drugs that have been described for use in TMD include glucosamine hydrochloride/chondroitin sulphate and propranolol. Despite many randomized control trials being conducted on these commonly used medications for TMD a systematic review carried out in 2010 concluded that there was insufficient evidence to support or not to support the use of these drugs in TMD.[1] Low-doses of anti-muscarinic tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline,[52] or nortriptyline have also been described.[53] In a subset of people with TMD who are not helped by either noninvasive and invasive treatments, long term use of opiate analgesics has been suggested, although these drugs carry a risk of drug dependence and other side effects.[54] Examples include morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, tramadol, hydrocodone, and methadone.[54]

Botulinum toxin solution (“Botox”) is sometimes used to treat TMD.[55] Injection of botox into the lateral pterygoid muscle has been investigated in multiple randomized control trials, and there is evidence that it is of benefit in TMD.[56] It is theorized that spasm of lateral pterygoid causes anterior disc displacement. Botulinum toxin causes temporary muscular paralysis by inhibiting acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction.[25] The effects usually last for a period of months before they wear off. Complications include the creation of a “fixed” expression due to diffusion of the solution and subsequent involvement of the muscles of facial expression,[56] which lasts until the effects of the botox wear off. Injections of local anesthetic, sometimes combined with steroids, into the muscles (e.g. the temoralis muscle or its tendon) are also sometimes used. Local anesthetics may provide temporary pain relief, and steroids inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokines.[46] Steroids and other medications are sometimes injected directly into the joint (See Intra-articular injections).

Physiotherapy, biofeedback and similar non-invasive measures

Physiotherapy (physical therapy) is sometimes used as an adjuvant to other methods of treatment in TMD.[57] There are many different approaches described, but exercises aiming to increase the range of mandibular movements are commonly involved.[46] Jaw exercises aim to directly oppose the negative effects of disuse that may occur in TMD, due to pain discouraging people from moving their jaw. After initial instruction, people are able to perform a physical therapy regimen at home. The most simple method is by regular stretching within pain tolerance, using the thumb and a finger in a “scissor” maneuver. Gentle force is applied until pain of resistance is felt, and then the position is held for several seconds. Commercial devices have been developed to carry out this stretching exercise (e.g. the “Therabite” appliance). Over time, the amount of mouth opening possible without pain can be gradually increased. A baseline record of the distance at the start of physical therapy (e.g. the number of fingers that can be placed vertically between the upper and lower incisors), can chart any improvement over time.[46]

It has been suggested that massage therapy for TMD improves both the subjective and objective health status.[58] “Friction massage” uses surface pressure to causes temporary ischemia and subsequent hyperemia in the muscles, and this is hypothesized to inactivate trigger points and disrupt small fibrous adhesions with in the muscle that have formed following surgery or muscular shortening due to restricted movement.[46]

Occasionally physiotherapy for TMD may include the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), which may override pain by stimulation of superficial nerve fibers and lead to pain reduction which extends after the time where the TENS is being actually being applied, possibly due to release of endorphins. Others recommend the use of ultrasound, theorized to produce tissue heating, alter blood flow and metabolic activity at a level that is deeper than possible with surface heat applications.[46] There is tentative evidence that low level laser therapy may help with pain.[59]

There is some evidence that some people who use nighttime biofeedback to reduce nighttime clenching experience a reduction in TMD.[60]

Occlusal adjustment

This is the adjustment or reorganizing of the existing occlusion, carried out in the belief that this will redistribute forces evenly across the dental arches and/or achieve a more favorable position of the condyles in the fossae, which is purported to lessen tooth wear, bruxism and TMD, but this is controversial. These techniques are sometimes termed “occlusal rehabilitation” or “occlusal equilibration”.[29] At its simplest, occlusal adjustment involves selective grinding (with a dental drill) of the enamel of the occlusal surfaces of teeth, with the aim of allowing the upper teeth to fit with the lower teeth in a more harmonious way.[14] However, there is much disagreement between proponents of these techniques on most of the aspects involved, including the indications and the exact goals. Occlusal adjustment can also be very complex, involving orthodontics, restorative dentistry or even orthognathic surgery. Some have criticized these occlusal reorganizations as having no evidence base, and irreversibly damaging the dentition on top of the damage already caused by bruxism.[29] A “middle ground” view of these techniques is that occlusal adjustment in most cases of TMD is neither desirable nor helpful as a first line treatment, and furthermore, with few exceptions, any adjustments should be reversible.[16] However, most dentists consider this unnecessary overtreatment,[16] with no evidence of benefit.[33] Specifically, orthodontics and orthognathic surgery are not considered by most to be appropriate treatments for TMD.[33] A systematic review investigating all the scientific studies carried out on occlusal adjustments in TMD concluded the following:

“There is an absence of evidence of effectiveness for occlusal adjustment. Based on these data occlusal adjustment cannot be recommended for the treatment or prevention of TMD.[35]

These conclusions were based largely on the fact that, despite many different scientific studies investigating this measure as a therapy, overall no statistically significant differences can be demonstrated between treatment with occlusal adjustment and treatment with placebo. The reviewers also stated that there are ethical implications if occlusal adjustment was found to be ineffective in preventing TMD.[35]

Orthodontic treatment, as described earlier, is sometimes listed as a possible predisposing factor in the development of TMD. On the other hand, orthodontic treatment is also often carried out in the belief that it may treat or prevent TMD. Another systematic review investigating the relationship between orthodontics and TMD concluded the following:

“There is no evidence to support or refute the use of orthodontic treatment for the treatment of TMD. In addition, there are no data which identify a link between active orthodontic intervention and the causation of TMD. Based on the lack of data, orthodontic treatment cannot be recommended for the treatment or prevention of TMD.”[14]

A common scenario where a newly placed dental restoration (e.g. a crown or a filling) is incorrectly contoured, and creates a premature contact in the bite. This may localize all the force of the bite onto one tooth, and cause inflammation of the periodontal ligament and reversible increase in tooth mobility. The tooth may become tender to bite on. Here, the “occlusal adjustment” has already taken place inadvertently, and the adjustment aims to return to the pre-existing occlusion. This should be distinguished from attempts to deliberately reorganize the native occlusion.

Surgery

Attempts in the last decade to develop surgical treatments based on MRI and CAT scans now receive less attention. These techniques are reserved for the most difficult cases where other therapeutic modalities have failed. The American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons recommends a conservative/non-surgical approach first. Only 20% of patients need to proceed to surgery.

Examples of surgical procedures that are used in TMD, some more commonly than others, include arthrocentesis, arthroscopy, menisectomy, disc repositioning, condylotomy or joint replacement. Invasive surgical procedures in TMD may cause symptoms to worsen.[3] Menisectomy, also termed discectomy refers to surgical removal of the articular disc. This is rarely carried out in TMD, it may have some benefits for pain, but dysfunction may persist and overall there it leads to degeneration or remodeling of the TMJ.[61]

Alternative medicine

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is sometimes used for TMD.[41] There is limited evidence that acupuncture is an effective symptomatic treatment for TMD.[62][63][64] A short term reduction in muscular pain of muscular origin can usually be observed after acupuncture in TMD,[64] and this is more than is seen with placebo.[65] There are no reported adverse events of acupuncture when used for TMD,[65] and some suggest that acupuncture is best employed as an adjuvent to other treatments in TMD.[64] However, some suggest that acupuncture may be no more effective than sham acupuncture,[66] that many of the studies investigating acupuncture and TMD suffer from significant risk of bias,[64] and that the long term efficacy of acupuncture for TMD is unknown.[64][65]

Chiropractic

Chiropractic adjustments (also termed manipulations or mobilizations) are sometimes used in the belief that this will treat TMD.[67] Related conditions that are also claimed to be treatable by chiropractic include tension headaches and neck pain. Some sources suggest that there is some evidence of efficacy of chiropractic treatment in TMD,[67] but the sources cited for these statements were case reports and a case series of only 9 participants. One review concluded “inconclusive evidence in a favorable direction regarding mobilization and massage for TMD”.[68] Overall, although there is general agreement that chiropractic may be of comparable benefit to other manual therapies for lower back pain, there is no credible evidence of efficacy in other conditions, including TMD.[69] However, there is some evidence of possible adverse effects from cervical (neck) vertebral manipulation, which sometimes may be serious.[69]

Prognosis

It has been suggested that the natural history of TMD is benign and self-limiting,[23] with symptoms slowly improving and resolving over time.[13] The prognosis is therefore good.[17] However, the persistent pain symptoms, psychological discomfort, physical disability and functional limitations may detriment quality of life.[70] It has been suggested that TMD does not cause permanent damage and does not progress to arthritis in later life,[23] however degenerative disorders of the TMJ such as osteoarthritis are included within the spectrum of TMDs in some classifications.

Epidemiology

TMD mostly affects people in the 20 – 40 age group,[3] and the average age is 33.9 years.[4] People with TMD tend to be younger adults,[17] who are otherwise healthy. Within the catchall umbrella of TMD, there are peaks for disc displacements at age 30, and for inflammatory-degenerative joint disorders at age 50.[5]

About 75% of the general population may have at least one abnormal sign associated with the TMJ (e.g. clicking), and about 33% have at least one symptom of TMD.[22] However, only in 3.6–7% will this be of sufficient severity to trigger the individual to seek medical advice.[22]

For unknown reasons, females are more likely to be affected than males, in a ratio of about 2:1,[4] although others report this ratio to be as high as 9:1.[22] Females are more likely to request treatment for TMD, and their symptoms are less likely to resolve.[22] Females with TMD are more likely to be nulliparous than females without TMD.[7] It has also been reported that female caucasians are more likely to be affected by TMD, and at an earlier age, than female African Americans.[17]

According to the most recent analyses of epidemiologic data using the RDC/TMD diagnostic criteria, of all TMD cases, group I (muscle disorders) accounts for 45.3%, group II (disc displacements) 41.1%, and group III (joint disorders) 30.1% (individuals may have diagnoses from more than one group).[5] Using the RDC/TMD criteria, TMD has a prevelence in the general population of 9.7% for group I, 11.4% for group IIa, and 2.6% for group IIIa.[5]

History

Temporomandibular disorders were described as early as ancient Egypt.[22] An older name for the condition is “Costen’s syndrome”, eponymously referring to James B. Costen.[71][72] Costen was an otolaryngologist,[73] and although he was not the first physician to describe TMD, he wrote extensively on the topic, starting in 1934, and was the first to approach the disorder in an integrated and systematic way.[74] Costen hypothesized that malocclusion caused TMD, and placed emphasis on ear symptoms, such as tinnitus, otaglia, impaired hearing, and even dizziness.[74] Specifically, Costen believed that the cause of TMD was mandibular over-closure,[73] recommending a treatment revolving around building up the bite.[73] The eponym “Costen syndrome” became commonly used shortly after his initial work,[74] but in modern times it has been dropped, partially because occlusal factors are now thought to play little, if any, role in the development of TMD,[17] and also because ear problems are now thought to be less associated with TMD. Other historically important terms that were used for TMD include “TMJ disease” or “TMJ syndrome”, which are now rarely used.[17]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:Temporomandibular joint dysfunction

Good TMJ Links

http://www.tmj.org/

https://www.painscience.com/articles/spot-07-masseter.php

http://www.triggerpointproducts.com/checkyoursymptoms

http://www.massagetoday.com/mpacms/mt/article.php?id=14578

http://bodymindconspiracy.com/how-to-fix-your-stupid-jaw-self-massage-for-tmj/

Body Therapy Therapist, Bodywork Santa Barbara, Goleta. Ca, Grad of BTI Body Therapy Institute in Santa Barbara, Ca. Studied with John Harris Olympic Massage Therapist,

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

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Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder Pain & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back Pain, Low Back Pain Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh Pain, Hamstring Pain and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

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What is Deep Tissue Massage and what to expect?

Deep tissue massage is massage that is designed to get into the connective tissue of the body, rather than just the surface muscles. As a massage therapist when I perform deep tissue I use a variety of techniques to deeply penetrate the muscles and fascia, loosening them and releasing tension. Most clients have a more intense experience with a deep tissue massage, but also feel that it is more beneficial, because it addresses deep-seated muscle pains. Deep tissue is beneficial when undertaken on a regular basis, so that I can work together with the client to correct long term problems, relax the body, and prevent injury.

To get a truly good deep tissue massage you need to find someone who specializes in deep tissue, like Nicola.  Most spas have several massage therapists who can offer a basic deep tissue massage integrating a number of techniques and styles customized for your body for maximum impact. Experiment by trying several deep tissue massage therapists to find the one that is right fit for you and your body.

One of the defining differences between deep tissue and regular massage is the use of tools. A standard massage usually only involves the hands and lower arms of the therapist. During a deep tissue, however,  I use elbows and fingers for deep, penetrating work in the muscle. A deep tissue massage also tends to be very slow, and I will use long, flowing strokes to ease in and out of the muscle. Going in too quickly can cause the muscle to tense up, which is not a desired reaction. I also maintain firm pressure at trouble spots for several minutes to achieve muscle release before moving on to the next area of the body.

Deep tissue massage is designed to relieve severe tension in the muscle and the connective tissue or fascia. This type of massage focuses on the muscles located below the surface of the top muscles. Deep tissue massage is often recommended for individuals who experience consistent pain, are involved in heavy physical activity, such as athletes, and patients who have sustained physical injury. It is also not uncommon for receivers of Deep Tissue Massage to have their pain replaced with a new muscle ache for a day or two. Deep tissue work varies greatly. What one calls deep tissue another will call light. When receiving deep tissue work it is important to communicate what you are feeling.

When you go to get a deep tissue massage, you should talk with the therapist about any  issues you might have and like to see addressed during your massage. I am happy   to concentrate on a single body part for an entire massage to achieve lasting results and in fact half of my clients want just that! It is also important to communicate with me about pain; The massage may be intense, but if a client starts to feel pain, he or she should communicate that immediately. I work on a scale of 1 – 10, where 7 is on the your comfortability edge for that day and 10 is very uncomfortable pain. A lot of my clients take the deep tissue pain or even like the pain in order to get the quickest results for their body type.  At the end of the session, lots of water should be consumed to help the body express the toxins released during the massage. You will probably be sore for a few days after the intense deep tissue treatment but that’s normal. Remember that ice is your friend.

 

Massage + Chronic Pain

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Imagine living with chronic pain. Every day you wake up—after a night where you might not have gotten very much sleep—knowing that your day will involve pain, most often in several areas of your body. Then, add in the depression and anxiety that often accompanies having to deal with chronic pain and what you have is this: a peek at what it’s like for someone who suffers from fibromyalgia or chronic myofascial pain syndrome (CMPS).

Though the causes of fibromyalgia and CMPS are unclear, what we are starting to better understand is how massage therapy can help people with these conditions better manage their pain. Read on to learn more.

A Quick Look at the Conditions

Although both fibromyalgia and CMPS present with pain, these are different conditions, and so having an idea of what each diagnosis entails is important.

Some recognizable symptoms of fibromyalgia can include irritable bowel syndrome, headaches, migraines, numbness in the upper and lower body, and joint stiffness that is distributed around several areas of the body. This condition is usually diagnosed when a minimum of 11 out of 18 tender points are active with pain to the touch. The areas where pain is most common amongst patients include the neck and lower back. Additional symptoms include recurrent feelings of exhaustion, musculoskeletal pain and a tingling or prickling feeling known as parathesia, which is similar to that of pins and needles and mainly caused by pressure or damage to the peripheral nerves. Generally speaking, too, fibromyalgia sufferers often have acute, superficial tender points.

According to the National Fibromyalgia Research Association, more than 6 million Americans, 90 percent of whom are women, suffer from fibromyalgia, with symptoms typically showing up between the ages of 20 and 55. Additionally, somewhere between 25 percent and 65 percent of the time, fibromyalgia presents along with other pain syndromes—most commonly rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and spinal arthritis.

With chronic myofascial pain syndrome, symptoms can begin to show up after some type of trauma or injury. This condition often occurs when a muscle has been contracted repetitively, like in jobs that require repetitive motion or when stress-related muscle tension is present.

Some notable symptoms of CMPS include lacrimation, deep aching that affects one group of muscles or several, complications with the vasomotor, cuticle fl ushing, an increase or decrease in body heat, and excessive sweating. Additionally, people with CMPS often have prolonged, deep aching trigger points with desensitized nerve endings, CMPS, unlike fibromyalgia, tends to affect both genders equally, typically appearing in adults who are between the ages of 30 and 60. A diagnosis is usually made when a person has experienced quadrant pain for at least six months or more.

What you Need to Know

 

Chronic-pain-1

 

Accurate information. Dr. Kimberly Miller, DC, founder of the Georgia Massage Institute in Winder, has some insight into both of these conditions, as she suffers from both fibromyalgia and CMPS. According to Miller, differentiating between these two diseases can be difficult, which can lead to some people being misdiagnosed and a whole host of other issues.

So, massage therapists are going to need to make sure these clients are in regular contact with their health care professional so they know they are getting the most accurate information regarding their diagnosis and disease during intake. Without this information, creating a treatment plan that is beneficial to the client will be difficult. For example, says Miller, clients with fibromyalgia are going to require different pressure than someone with CMPS. “A misdiagnosis leads to an incorrect medication and treatment plan,” Miller explains. “When receiving manual therapy, for example, a patient with CMPS requires the deepest pressure while the true fibromyalgia patient requires only the lightest of touch.”

Understanding the difference and diagnosis. Most, if not all, the clients you see with either of these conditions will have a diagnosis before they make an appointment. With this in mind, massage therapists should have some idea of what these diagnoses involve, as well as what the condition means for the individual client. For example, what are the client’s main symptoms? Where is the pain most intense? What treatments are they currently using to deal with the diagnosis? Before you and the client can decide how massage therapy will best benefit them, you’re going to have to have a good idea of both the condition and how the condition affects their lives.

Doing a thorough intake. Intake is always important, no matter who you are working with. But especially with clients who have a diagnosed medical condition, you’re going to have to be thorough. “During the initial appointment, I do a detailed written health history,” explains Miller. “Then, I sit and go over the written health history with them.” At each subsequent appointment, Miller follows up with questions concerning pain, asking the client where they are on a scale of 0 to 10 at that moment. She also asks about any recent flare-ups since the last visit, and has a conversation about how the massage therapy sessions are working. “I want to know how they’re feeling after the session, as well as how they’re feeling a few days after the session,” Miller says. “I also ask if they’re getting relief so I can make sure we’re on the right track.”

A typical session. For a client with CMPS, a session is typically going to last approximately 30 minutes to an hour and should involve deeper pressure. According to Miller, massage therapists should focus on areas where the pain is most severe. “There are common areas of pain and dysfunction for CMPS patients, which is usually around the joints,” she says.

Applying deep pressure for these clients can take a toll on the massage therapist, so Miller encourages practitioners to find a way to work that takes some of the stress off their own bodies. For example, you might find working with your elbows helps you get the depth you need without straining your own body.

When working with clients who have fibromyalgia, massage therapists are going to need to use a lighter touch. Miller recommends touch that is surfaceoriented and doesn’t apply any pressure to the client’s skin. “Work on the top of the skin to stimulate blood flow,” she encourages. “Then work superfi cially all over the body.”

And don’t be afraid to change things up if what you’re doing isn’t working. Miller gives any one treatment plan between four to six massage sessions before she reevaluates and then, if the client isn’t seeing any relief, they begin to look at making some changes. “Maybe the pressure or the length of massage is a little off,” says Miller. “Or perhaps we need to vary the technique we’re using.”

Miller says that most often it’s the clients with fibromyalgia that need to more frequently reassess and change direction, as the clients with CMPS typically benefit from sessions that incorporate deep tissue massage. “Clients with CMPS are pretty much going to be deep tissue every single time,” she explains. “There are usually more variables involved with the clients who have fibromyalgia.”

Make adjustments. If you work with other consumer demographics that are dealing with a particular health condition, knowing that you’re going to have to make some adjustments to each session, for each client, isn’t going to come as a surprise. As Miller notes, clients with CMPS may like and need deep pressure, whereas clients with fibromyalgia might only be able to withstand the lightest of touch. Additionally, there may be some appointments where clients come for pain relief and others where stress relief is what is going to be more beneficial.

Think, too, of your physical space. These clients may very well have some sensitivities that are going to need to be accounted for prior to each appointment. For example, you might fi nd that strong scents are disagreeable to some of these clients, or that they need the lights to be dimmed. Music, too, could be a trigger, so be sure to talk to your client about music, oil and lighting preferences before each massage session.

With these clients, checking in during the session is going to be imperative. Massage therapists are going to need to verify that pressure is appropriate and the client is comfortable. You may find some people only want you to work where they are experiencing the most pain. Or, perhaps they want you to deal with their trigger points. Regardless, let them guide the session and set the pace, and understand if they need to take a break.

Medication and massage. As with many people who deal with chronic health conditions, most of these clients are probably going to be on at least one—and potentially multiple—medications. So, massage therapists are going to need to be aware of the medications being used and fully understand how these medications might impact a massage therapy session.

When working with clients who have CMPS, fibromyalgia or other chronic pain conditions, the goal is helping them better manage the pain that is, for many, a part of their everyday lives. Learning how massage therapy can benefit people suffering from a variety of health conditions provides massage therapists with a real opportunity to reach out to new clients with the message of how massage can help.

 

Dementions-of-pain-low-res


From the Client’s Perspective

Holly Ingraham, who was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in February of 2013, had visited a chiropractor and an orthopedic doctor prior to becoming a patient of Dr. Kimberly Miller DC, founder of the Georgia Massage Institute in Winder. “She started me on a regimen of having two massages a week and then an adjustment right after the massages,” explains Ingraham, describing the treatment plan she and Miller devised together.

Ingraham, a 39-year-old wife and mother, was experiencing some pain due to both a herniated disc and bulging disc after an injury at work. At first, she attributed the lower back pain she felt to over-compensation due to the injury. But that turned out not to be the case, and soon she realized she was dealing with what would become a life-changing diagnosis: fibromyalgia.

For Ingraham, nothing’s been the same since she learned she had fibromyalgia. “It’s changed everything. It’s changed the way I’m able to be a mother. It’s changed the way I’m able to be a wife, and it’s aff ected my sleep,” she explains. “It affects my ability to work, my mood, and my ability to do things for myself. It’s horrible.”

Although the pain is always present, Ingraham has noticed the massage therapy she receives from Miller helps make the pain bearable. Before massage, her pain was at a nine (with 10 being the worst). After massage, she says, her pain is at a manageable five or six. In addition to the weekly massages, Miller showed her some neck and back stretches she can do between sessions to help keep the pain at bay.

Judy Carlisle, a client with chronic myofascial pain syndrome (CMPS) has been seeing Miller for the past nine years and says that when she couldn’t get to her session for three weeks, she could defi nitely feel the diff erence. “I was a mess when I got to her,” says the 70-year-old retired registered nurse whose condition has affected her ability to get around. “Everything was so tight and stiff .”

Ingraham had a similar experience after missing just one week of massages with Miller. “That’s when I could really feel the difference because I’m always in pain and I always feel tired, even when I get B-12 shots and take supplements,” she says. “But when I didn’t go for the massage and the adjustment, I was miserable.”

For Carlisle, a session with Miller includes a deep tissue massage for 30 minutes to an hour. She believes the weekly massages have helped improve her mobility, circulation, muscle soreness, as well as decreasing the pain she feels in her upper body. “I’ve been going to Dr. Kim for a long time, and she’s really done a lot to help,” says Carlisle. “If I had any idea that massage would do for you what it’s done for me, I would’ve started a long, long time ago.”

Consistency is key. For these clients, regular massage therapy is going to be key, as pain and other issues tend to reappear if time between appointments is too great.

 

 

 

pain_management

 

Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Massage Santa Barbara. Deep Tissue Massage Santa Barbara, Swedish Massage Santa Barbara, Sports Massage Santa Barbara, Barefoot Massage Santa Barbara, Trigger Point Massage, Reflexology Massage, Professional Bodywork, Santa Barbara Massage, Massage Santa Barbara, Massage Ventura, Montecito, Carpinteria, Summerland, Goleta, Tri Counties Massage: Nicola, LMT. Licensed Massage Therapist. 805- 637-7482 On the EDGE Therapeutic Deep Tissue, Swedish Healing Massage: Massage Santa Barbara, Ventura, Montecito, Carpinteria, Summerland, Goleta, San Ynez Valley, Buelton and the Tri Counties., Ca.

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Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.
Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue, Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482
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Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

 

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

The Most Famous Accupressure Point: What Does It, LI #4 Large Intestine point #4, really do?

 

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder Pain & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back Pain, Low Back Pain Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh Pain, Hamstring Pain and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

 

The Most Famous Accupressure Point: What Does It Really Do?

Ask anyone to locate the one acupressure point that they’re aware of and inevitably they will show you the web between their thumb and forefinger and proudly state that location is perfect to push on to get rid of a headache.

 

 

Yes, that point, Large Intestine point #4, is great for headaches, as well as number of other ailments, many of which strike athletes in particular.

 

First and foremost, let’s locate the point accurately. The actual anatomic description of location reads as follows, “On the dorsum of the hand, between the first and second metacarpal bones, approximately in the middle of the second metacarpal bone on the radial side.”

 

In layperson speak; the best way to find the “actual” point location is to find where your thumb and pointer finger meet towards the base of your wrist. Once you’ve located that area, slide your finger along the bone of your pointer finger about a half an inch towards the tip and then come out off of that bone towards your thumb. (Another easy way to find the exact location of is to squeeze your thumb into your index finger and the top of the “lump” created by the web is your spot.)

 

The point itself is about as big as a nickel so don’t feel that you need to be pinpoint accurate in finding it. You can see in the photos where the point lies.

 

In Peter Deadman’s Manual of Acupuncture, the California State Board’s designated acupuncture book, each individual acupuncture point is described and outlined for roughly one page. Large Intestine – 4, or “Hegu” as the point is called in Chinese – has four whole pages allocated to it due the vast number of ailments that it can be used with.

 

First and foremost, this point is prescribed for any issue related to the head and face, including:

 

 

 

Secondly, and how I most use this point in practice, is for any pain condition in the body.  If I have a patient with knee pain, then I’ll use LI-4 conjunction with other points around the knee. The same thing will happen with pain anywhere else in the body, as someone that sees primarily athletes, I use this point with almost every treatment.

 

Although you’re not going to be inserting needles into yourselves, this point is still highly effective with acupressure as well. Using your thumb and forefinger of the opposite hand, squeeze this area until you feel a mild discomfort. Continue to hold that pressure for 20 – 30 seconds and then release. Repeat as often as necessary throughout the day until you feel that you have evoked a change in the condition from which you are suffering. This is a fantastic combination to add to your ice, heat and stretching regimen, especially when dealing with an injury or ailment.

 

The only caution that comes with the point is that it is contra-indicated in pregnancy due to its ability to promote labor.

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

What is Cupping Therapy Massage / Myofascial Decompression (MFD).?

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder Pain & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back Pain, Low Back Pain Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh Pain, Hamstring Pain and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

Cupping therapy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cupping therapy
Fire Cupping.jpg

A patient receiving fire cupping therapy

Cupping therapy is an ancient form of alternative medicine in which a local suction is created on the skin; practitioners believe this mobilizes blood flow in order to promote healing.[1] Suction is created using heat (fire) or mechanical devices (hand or electrical pumps). It is known in local languages as Meyboom,baguan/baguar, badkesh, banki, bahnkes, bekam, buhang, bentusa, kyukaku, giác hơi, Hijamah, kavaa (ކަވާ), mihceme,[2] and singhi among others. [3]

Contents

Description

Through either heat or suction, the skin is gently drawn upwards by creating a vacuum in a cup over the target area of the skin. The cup stays in place for five to fifteen minutes. It is believed by some to help treat pain, deep scar tissues in the muscles and connective tissue, muscle knots, and swelling.

History

There is reason to believe the practice dates from as early as 3000 BC. The Ebers Papyrus, written c. 1550 BC and one of the oldest medical textbooks in the world, describes the Egyptians‘ use of cupping. Archaeologists have found evidence in China of cupping dating back to 1000 BC. In ancient Greece, Hippocrates (c. 400 BC) used cupping for internal disease and structural problems. This method in multiple forms spread into medicine throughout Asian and European civilizations.[citation needed]

Methods

Broadly speaking there are two types of cupping: dry cupping and bleeding or wet cupping (controlled bleeding) with wet cupping being more common.[citation needed] The British Cupping Society (BCS), an organisation promoting the practice, teaches both. As a general rule, wet cupping provides a more “curative-treatment approach” to patient management whereas dry cupping appeals more to a “therapeutic and relaxation approach”. Preference varies with practitioners and cultures.[citation needed]

Dry cupping

Bamboo cups

The cupping procedure commonly involves creating a small area of low air pressure next to the skin. However, there is variety in the tools used, the method of creating the low pressure, and the procedures followed during the treatment.[4]

The cups can be various shapes including balls or bells, and may range in size from 1 to 3 inches (25 to 76 mm) across the opening. Plastic and glass are the most common materials used today, replacing the horn, pottery, bronze and bamboo cups used in earlier times. The low air pressure required may be created by heating the cup or the air inside it with an open flame or a bath in hot scented oils, then placing it against the skin. As the air inside the cup cools, it contracts and draws the skin slightly inside. More recently, vacuum can be created with a mechanical suction pump acting through a valve located at the top of the cup. Rubber cups are also available that squeeze the air out and adapt to uneven or bony surfaces.[citation needed]

In practice, cups are normally used only on softer tissue that can form a good seal with the edge of the cup. They may be used singly or with many to cover a larger area. They may be used by themselves or placed over an acupuncture needle. Skin may be lubricated, allowing the cup to move across the skin slowly.

Depending on the specific treatment, skin marking is common after the cups are removed. This may be a simple red ring that disappears quickly, the discolouration left by the cups is normally from bruising especially if dragging the cups while suctioned from one place to another to break down muscle fiber. Usually treatments are not painful.

Fire cupping

A woman receiving fire cupping at a roadside business in Haikou, Hainan, China.

Fire cupping involves soaking a cotton ball in 70% alcohol. The cotton is then clamped by a pair of forceps and lit via match or lighter. The flaming cotton ball is then, in one fluid motion, placed into the cup, quickly removed, and the cup is placed on the skin. By adding fire to the inside of the cup, oxygen is removed (which is replaced with an equal volume of carbon dioxide) and a small amount of suction is created by the air cooling down again. Massage oil may be applied to create a better seal as well as allow the cups to glide over muscle groups (e.g. trapezius, erectors, latisimus dorsi, etc.) in an act called “moving cupping“. Dark circles may appear where the cups were placed due to rupture of the capillaries just under the skin, but are not the same as a bruise caused by blunt-force trauma.

Wet cupping (Al-Hijamah or medicinal bleeding)

Further information: Hijama

While the history of wet cupping may date back thousands of years, the first documented uses are found in the teachings of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[5] According to Muhammad al-Bukhari, Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj Nishapuri and Ahmad ibn Hanbal, Muhammad approved of the Hijama (cupping) treatment.[6]

A number of hadith support its recommendation and use by Muhammad. As a result, the practice of cupping therapy has survived in Muslim countries. Today, wet cupping is a popular remedy practiced in many parts of the Muslim world .[7]

Alternatively, mild suction is created using a cup and a pump (or heat suction) on the selected area and left for about three minutes. The cup is then removed and small superficial skin incisions are made using a cupping scalpel. A second suction is used to carefully draw out a small quantity of blood. The procedure was piloted and developed by Ullah et al 2005 and has been endorsed by the British Cupping Society[1] which aims to promote, protect and develop professional standards in cupping therapy.

In Finland, wet cupping has been done at least since the 15th century, and it is done traditionally in saunas. The cupping cups were made of cow’s horns with a valve mechanism in it to create an underpressure on them by sucking the air out. Cupping is still used in Finland as an alternative medicine.

Traditional Chinese medicine cupping

According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) cupping is a method of creating a vacuum on the patient’s skin to dispel stagnation[citation needed]stagnant blood and lymph, thereby improving qi flow[citation needed] — to treat respiratory diseases such as the common cold, pneumonia and bronchitis.[citation needed] Cupping also is used on back, neck, shoulder and other musculoskeletal conditions. Its advocates say it has other applications, as well.[8] Cupping is not advised over skin ulcers or to the abdominal or sacral regions of pregnant women.[9]

Limited bruising cupping

New silicone therapy cups are claimed to alleviate bruising associated with traditional cupping.[citation needed] The cups are easier to use and are pliable, unlike glass or plastic, allowing for home use. Due to the lack of bruising and overall comfort, silicone cups are mainly smaller in size and used for facial cupping. Hydration before and after the therapy and general massage can also help reduce the bruising from cupping.[citation needed]

Practice

Cupping is claimed to treat a broad range of medical conditions such as blood disorders (anaemia, haemophilia), rheumatic diseases (arthritic joint and muscular conditions), fertility and gynaecological disorders, and skin problems (eczema, acne),[citation needed] and is claimed by proponents to help general physical and psychological well-being.[citation needed]

There is a description of cupping in George Orwell‘s essay “How the Poor Die“, where he was surprised to find it practiced in a Paris hospital.

Effectiveness

In their 2008 book Trick or Treatment, Simon Singh and Edzard Ernst write that no evidence exists of any beneficial effects of cupping for any medical condition.[10]

Cupping is widely used as an alternative treatment for cancer. However, the American Cancer Society notes that “available scientific evidence does not support claims that cupping has any health benefits” and also that the treatment carries a small risk of burns.[3]

A 2012 review of the evidence in an article published in PLOS ONE said that studies appeared to show that cupping therapy was effective for treating a number of conditions, but that “nearly all included trials were evaluated as high risk of bias” – better designed studies would be needed in order to reach definitive conclusions.[11]

Very few scientific studies have been conducted on the validity of cupping as an alternative medical practice. In fact, a significant amount of studies either do not support cupping practices or are unable to reach a conclusion concerning its effectiveness.

Traditional Persian medicine in Iran takes advantage of wet cupping practices, for the belief that cupping with scarification may eliminate the scar tissue, and cupping without scarification would cleanse the body through the organs (Nimrouzi et al., 2014).[12] Research suggests that this practice is indeed harmful, especially to thin or obese patients. It may be noted that individuals of profound interest in the practice are religious and seek purification. According to Jack Raso (1997),[13] cupping results in capillary expansion, excessive fluid accumulation in tissues, and the rupture of blood vessels. Although bruising caused by this practice is common, minor, and temporary, continuation may cause burns of the skin. Individuals have been performing the action for over 3,000 years, it is still yet to be scientifically proven. The practice is performed unsupervised, without any medical background, and often indicates more risks than obvious benefits.

In a recent controlled study by Cho and colleagues (2014),[14] traditional East-Asian medical practices were evaluated in terms of effectiveness against lower back pain. Cupping was evaluated by the current Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and with evidence from current systematic reviews and meta-analyses. They found that out of thirteen CPGs, only one recommended cupping. The researchers therefore weakly recommended cupping for both (sub) acute and chronic lower back pain. It may be that cupping is more a traditional act of “faith healing” rather than an act of medicine.

See also

References

 

 

External links

Cupping and the Injured Athlete – Does It Work?

 More articles by Brandi-All Articles by Brandi Ross

 

Throughout history, there have been many eastern and western forms of medicine that have come and gone. Some have survived the test of time. Others have been considered to be more “trendy” while other techniques are meant to repeat themselves over time. Today, myofascial decompression, better known as cupping, has made a return to western society, especially in the physical therapy and athletic training room settings. 

 

I was first exposed to this over a year ago. At the time, I didn’t fully understand it nor did I see it benefiting any athletes. This past summer a colleague took a course and was actually shown how to properly set up and use myofascial decompression (MFD). I was rather impressed with the results. So, naturally, I took the course in December. Since then, I have seen fairly good results with getting athletes to return to the playing field after other ‘traditional’ methods did not seem to work.

 

Cupping has origins dating as far back as Egyptian hieroglyphic writing around 1500 B.C.1. However, the earliest recorded methods may have been between 281-341 A. D.2. Cupping, also known as jiaofa, continued to be part of both eastern and western practices. By the mid to late 1800’s, criticism surrounded the method and western practitioners began to decline. Western science and medicine was looking to discredit eastern practices because there was no scientific backing to what was being performed1. Chinese Medicine and other eastern medicinal therapies continued to progress in other parts of the world.

 

Cupping began to return to western practices in the mid to late 20th Century with the development of both glass and plastic cups2. Although there is still no concrete scientific evidence to the effectiveness of cupping, there seems to be a positive outcome in most cases. I can say this from experience: after having taken the course, I have been applying the procedures to various athletes and I’m still amazed and shocked at the results I have been getting.

 

I have been using myofascial decompression on a wide variety of athletes over the past two months. The results have been rather interesting. Yes, I was skeptical as to how this would work. I still can’t explain all of it, but I do know that subjectively, athletes have been responding to the effects of MFD. I am happy to say that the use of MFD on plantar fasciitis has had some of the most favorable responses.

 

plantar fasciitis, cupping for plantar fasciitisThe first athlete on whom I used MFD was caught in the early stages of the plantar fasciitis. He had just begun to notice pain in his foot with waking in the mornings then continues a few more days when he started to notice it with running. He was open to trying the technique. After the first treatment, he notice marked improvement and decreased pain with waking. Approximately five days later, a second treatment was done.  Since then, he has been pain-free and running without incident. As you can see, here is a prime example of how early use of MFD can be beneficial in care.

 

The second athlete, also with plantar fasciitis, has had similar but different results from the first case. Here, the athlete has been treated with conventional means (excluding a night splint) for nearly four months with little to no improvement. MFD was suggested to her. The first treatment resulted in decreased muscular tightness in her calf and foot. However, the pain was still present. A second treatment was done with similar results. Pain diminished slightly but not to expectations. A third treatment was schedule but she did not return. She was seen by a podiatrist who injected her with cortisone. To this day, there still has been little change since the injection.

 

Most recently, another athlete has been added to the list of plantar fasciitis cases. She was treated bilaterally with MFD. Upon her first treatment, she noticed good improvement with both pain and muscle tightness. Both had decreased and she was walking normally. She was also able to walk on her toes with little to no discomfort. Due to the team’s travel schedule, she has not been able to do an additional treatment. However, she seems to be doing fairly well and uses night splints to aid in her treatments.

 

Another athlete was having issues with this iliotibial band (ITB) and hamstring. His chief complaint was tightness and mild pain on the outside of his knee. He was also four months post-ACL reconstruction at that time. He had four cups placed along his ITB. Upon removal, he immediately noticed that his ITB was looser. He has had no further treatments on his ITB and continues to progress in his rehabilitation without incident. The cups were also used on this hamstring due to some flexibility issues. After two treatments, he has gained more flexibility and now continues to improve his strength and stability. 

 

The next athlete is a more unique situation in comparison to the other athletes. This athlete presented with a calf strain. He was treated with initial conservative treatment to control pain and swelling. After the first three days, I opted to incorporate the use of one cup. This cup was used to almost flush the area. As I ran the cup over the affected area, I felt grit. It was like driving over a bad gravel road. Actually, he had so many adhesions, I could hear the grit. It was very audible. After the first treatment, he reported pain was gone and noticed that he had more flexibility and motion on the injured side. He was treated again two days later with the same procedure. Within a week, he was able to return to limited practice. He continues to move forward and should be 100% in the near future.

 

I’m still amazed at what I have seen with MFD. Every time I use it, I ask for feedback from the athletes. So far, almost all results have been favorable. It’s good to see an ancient therapeutic method still has value today. If you have the chance to have this done to you, try it. You will be surprised at what happens. I can’t explain it scientifically, but I can say it has been an eye-opener.

 

Will this work for everything? I can’t say that. I mean not everything works for everyone. It’s trial and error. As long as I see positive results, I will incorporate that into an athlete’s rehabilitation program. If I don’t see results, then I will move forward into another area of treatment. All I can say is, be open and willing to try a new method. You never know what might happen.

 

References:

1. Bentley, Bruce. A Brief History of Cupping. February 2008.

2. Dharmananda, Subhuti, PhD. Cupping. March 1999.

New Methods of Myofascial Decompression (Cupping) for Athletes

 

The most challenging part of myofascial decompression (MFD), better known as cupping, is the bruise marks. Almost everyone, athletes included, is left with circular marks from the negative pressure of the cups. These can last anywhere from three to seven days, sometimes even longer. Believe me, I make sure the athlete knows what he or she is in for. Each time, the athlete has been receptive, saying, “I’ll try it if it will help me get better.” But MFD for athletes is different from your traditional version for relaxation. Work is required by the athlete in order to see some of the best benefits possible.

 

mfd, myofascial decompression, cupping, cupping for athletesI’ve been using MFD in my practice for over a year now. I’ve used it therapeutically to treat almost any injury, from plantar fasciitis to hamstring strains to myofascial restrictions unrelated to injury. I’m surprisingly pleased with how many of the athletes are asking for repeat treatments. Although they all complain about how sore it makes them, they are pleased and excited with the outcomes: increased flexibility, fewer restrictions, and an overall feeling of being better.

 

Those key words from the athletes are what keep me using and expanding my knowledge of MFD. I’ve even done a before and after with several of them. I assess their range of motion before the treatment, especially hamstrings, and compare it with post-treatment results. I have found three techniques that are most helpful. Two of the three require active movement from the athlete after the cups have been placed:

 

  1. The first is an active flexion/extension movement. Although painful at the start, most of the athletes indicate more movement. After treatment the range of motion increases by ten to fifteen degrees.
  2. The more aggressive technique has that athlete prone, leg off the table, hip flexed, and knee flexed. The goal is to get the heel down and extend the knee. If they can get the heel to touch the ground then that is excellent progress. For runners, this mimics more the motion required to propel forward. Again, this is painful when the person move, but the gains are invaluable.

 

Swimmers have also inquired about MFD and there are two clients in particular I’ve worked with. Both were having “reach and pull” issues on their strokes. The focus was placed on the latissimus dorsi and teres major. After the cups were placed, they were asked to extend and slightly pull down with the arm. Motion increased in both. One of them even had the fastest swim of his career! He is so happy with the results he plans on doing another treatment before conference. It’s wonderfully exciting to see the success achieved by the athletes.

 

MFD has its benefits for everyone. I tend to focus on athletes and their return to play or improved performance enhancement. I cannot say if it is the right treatment for everyone. It depends on what you are trying to achieve. My focus is on active motion with MFD. Other professionals prefer to use MFD as a way of relaxation.

 

mfd, myofascial decompression, cupping, cupping for athletes

The traditional way of using MFD is following the meridian lines of the body. The cups are placed along these particular lines to elicit change within the body. I’ve even seen someone cry after being treated because it fell along one of the emotional lines. It was surprising to see, but I knew to expect it. I have also known people who had it done to help with general back pain and soreness. Funny thing is, they fell asleep with the cups on them. When it’s being used in this manner, anything is possible.

 

Two completely different methods, using the same equipment, can elicit such different results. It’s really interesting to see the old methods intertwined with new concepts and theories. As we move forward with research and literature, we continue to see so many amazing changes to traditional theories, with MFD being a good example. From the early years, where it was solely used for medicinal and relaxation to purposes to the current trend of using movement patterns with MFD, the treatment practice has grown immensely. Now, it’s the en vogue treatment for athletes and weekend warriors.

 

Anyone who is interested in experiencing either form of this treatment needs to seek out a practitioner qualified in MFD. If you want a relaxing experience with MFD, then it is recommended to seek out a licensed acupuncturist. Most will generally have knowledge and skill in the use of MFD. If you are seeking the more aggressive MFD utilizing movement, that will be more difficult to locate. In the athletic realm, some physical therapists and athletic trainers have taken coursework in incorporating MFD and movement. More professionals on the West Coast may have exposure to such techniques. As with anything, please make sure to ask questions before jumping into something new. Make sure it’s what is right for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

Massage for lower low back pain. Sports Body Flush,Therapeutic Pain Relief Therapy

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

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Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

Massage Therapy for Low Back Pain (So Low That It’s Not In the Back)

Perfect Spot No. 12, a common (almost universal) trigger point in the superolateral origin of the gluteus maximus muscle

published 2005, updated 2012
Another great article by Paul Ingraham, Vancouver, Canadabio


illustrations by Paul Ingraham, Gary Lyons, Lindsay McGee

“I have fibromyalgia and ache all the time, especially in the back and the hips. But what appears to sometimes be a backache is actually originating in the hips … this is probably the best information I have read explaining what is really going on!” ~ anonymous reader

 

Trigger points (TrPs), or muscle knots, are a common cause of stubborn and strange aches and pains, and yet they are under-diagnosed. The 13 Perfect Spots (jump to list below) are trigger points that are common and yet fairly easy to massage yourself — the most satisfying and useful places to apply pressure to muscle. For tough cases, see the advanced trigger points treatment guide.

 

Pain Location Problems Related Muscles
in the lower back, buttocks, hip, hamstrings low back pain, sciatica, sacroiliac joint dysfunction gluteus maximus
“Big Red Books” Reference: Volume 2, Chapter 7
see chart of all spots below

At the top of the gluteal muscles lies a Perfect Spot among Perfect Spots: a sneaky but trouble-making brute of a TrP that commonly forms in the roots of the gluteus maximus muscle, just below the pit of the low back, but experienced as low back pain. This is the kind of spot that the Perfect Spots concept is really all about — not only does it tend to produce a profound and sweet ache when massaged, but the extent of the pain that spreads out around it is almost always a surprise.

Amaze your friends! It’s one thing to massage a Perfect Spot in a familiar location for pain and stiffness, like under the back of skull, but it’s an even bigger treat to reveal one where none was even suspected. Confusion about where the pain is coming from is always a symptom of this spot. When it’s active, people assume they need a back rub. “My back hurts,” they say, as they point right at the top of their buttocks. “Well, that’s not actually your back — that’s your butt,” I say. People usually don’t consciously realize that it’s the buttocks that are the problem until you actually press on the spot — but then they recognize it as the epicentre of tension in the region. What’s going on?

 

Why is Perfect Spot No. 12 so perfect for treating low back pain?

Like all the Perfect Spots, Spot No. 12 is in an extensor muscle: but gluteus maximus is a particularly massive and thick extensor muscle. Along with the quadriceps, it’s known as an “anti-gravity” muscle for its powerful lifting action. Your gluteus maximus is heavily recruited for stair climbing and jumping. Trigger points in large muscles like this are often sneaky: that is, big muscles seem to tolerate a lot of knotting up before you start to notice them. A feeling of fatigue, stiffness, and heaviness in the area can get well-established before it actually starts to hurt, so you can build up quite a significant TrP in the gluteus maximus without being any wiser. This may explain why hardly anyone seems to know about this spot until it is massaged.

Not only is gluteus maximus a big ol’ extensor, it’s also located in what is arguably one of the least vulnerable places in the human body. The buttocks are well-padded, sometimes with both fat and muscle, and cover the largest bony structures in our skeleton. Muscle knots in muscles that open the body tend to feel satisfying and safe, producing a “sweet” ache instead of sharp or burning quality.1 This is meaningful in the context of low back pain, because low back pain scares people. The great majority of low back pain patients unnecessarily fear that their pain is related to structural problems and spinal fragility.2 But not only is the spine extremely sturdy and the bark of low back pain far worse than its bite, much of the pain is usually coming from lower down — from the nearly indestructible gluteus maximus.

The single best thing you can do for the great majority of back pain patients is to reassure them, and nothing works better than to massage Perfect Spot No. 12, because it feels like it has extremely strong relevance to the back pain … yet it’s radiating from the meaty depths of this anatomically straightforward and sturdy region of pure muscle and bone.

ZOOM

The top edge of the gluteus maximus muscle slices across the top of the buttocks on a diagonal line, from the low back dimple to the bump of bone on the side of the hip (greater trochanter). That ridge of muscle is fairly easy to find, even for the beginner. Pressure may feel satisfying at any point along that ridge, but Perfect Spot No. 12 is in the upper, inner end of it.

How do you find Perfect Spot No. 12?

The gluteus maximus is a large muscle, and contains a few pretty good spots for massage. The best by far, however, is near the top, along the thickened edge (superolateral) where the gluteus maximus attaches to the pelvic bone. This is easy to find: just look for the low back dimples! Almost everyone has them.

If you are working on someone without low back dimples (and there are a few), you’ll have to go by feel. The dimples mark the location of a pair of distinct bumps of bone on either side of the extreme low back, approximately an inch or two away from the spine. (The skin usually dimples over them because it is sort of attached at those points.)

Once you’ve found the dimples and/or the bumps of bone, you’re practically there. The gluteus maximus is attached to the bottom edge of that bump. If you strum your fingers back and forth (side to side) just beneath the bump, you will easily feel a thick bundle of almost vertical muscle. That’s the edge of the gluteus maximus! The best place to press on it is usually about a centimetre below the bone. The best angle is usually pressing from the side, straight towards the centre.

What does Perfect Spot No. 12 feel like?

As mentioned in the introduction, Perfect Spot No. 12 often feels like back pain. Which is odd, because it’s in your butt.

Bizarrely, at least half of low back pain is actually primarily buttock pain. I call this the “butt-back connection.” The top of the pelvic bone, the iliac crest that defines the bottom of the waist, sharply divides the back from the buttocks. There are no muscles that cross that line of bone. Yet the gluteus maximus is in many ways a continuation of the back muscles, and vice versa — they work together, and they tend to suffer together.

The most significant TrPs of the back muscles (which form Perfect Spot No. 13, next in the series), are just an inch or two away from Perfect Spot No. 12, and trouble in either Spot tends to irritate the other. Mature TrPs at Perfect Spot No. 12 tend to radiate a deep, back-aching sensation both downwards through the buttocks and upwards into the low back. The low back TrPs return the favour. TrPs in the gluteus medius and minimus (see Massage Therapy for Back Pain, Hip Pain, and Sciatica) can also participate in this unholy alliance. Although they tend to produce more leg pain than back pain, their symptoms are often mistakenly believed to be a symptom of nerve root compression in the back, or sciatica.3

It’s common for an amateur back massager to miss this crucial spot. Visually, it appears to be too low to have anything to do with the back. The inexperienced therapist will rub only in the low back itself, typically finding plenty of stiff and sore muscles, yet somehow failing to fully satisfy the patient and feeling like they are working somewhat above the real problem. Even if directed to move lower — which doesn’t always happen, because the massage recipient is often equally unsure of where the discomfort is really centered — the therapist may still not get to the source of the trouble, because Perfect Spot No. 12 is lurking right around a projection of bone and does not seem a likely place for important work. Yet that is often exactly what’s needed.

Confusion with the sacroiliac joint

When Perfect Spot No. 12 isn’t being mistaken for back pain, or contributing to false sciatica, it’s getting mistaken for sacroiliac joint pain … resulting in a nearly perfect record of being mistaken for anything other than what it is. The confusion arises because many therapists place an excessive focus on the clinical importance of subtle sacroiliac joint problems, as though the slightest problem here can wreak havoc.

“The sacroiliac joint” — the barely-mobile joint between the pelvis and the sacrum — is one of those joints that patients sometimes learn to refer to, because they’ve heard therapists say it (somewhat like parrots imitating things people have said around them). Unfortunately, the use of the name is rarely associated with actual comprehension, either by the therapists or their innocent patients, because sacroiliac joint pain and dysfunction is so over-rated and over-diagnosed. Certainly problems with this joint do exist: my wife suffered substantial injury to her sacroiliac joint in a car accident, and I’ve seen what it can be like. But that perspective only makes me more confident that most alleged sacroiliac joint pain is probably just the discomfort associated with Perfect Spot No. 12. The joint itself is pretty robust, and is rarely a major contributor to the most common pains in the area.

Perfect Spot No. 12 has a nearly perfect record of being mistaken for anything other than what it is!

Consider this typical case study, one many similar cases I’ve seen: One of my patients spent a few years with chronic moderate-intensity pain in her hip and/or low back. She was never quite sure which, true to the nature of a gluteus maximus TrP. She also believed that it was a sacroiliac joint problem, and this had been affirmed repeatedly by therapists, so her belief was strong. However, it turned out that pressure on Perfect Spot No. 12 was rapidly therapeutic, whereas years of “adjustments” for a non-existent sacroiliac joint problem had simply failed her. Here’s what I heard from her months later:

Just wanted to give you a quick update … my back has been absolutely fine. Unbelievable … or perhaps not, considering what I’ve learned from you! A big thank you for all your help.

Lois McConnell, retired airline executive, suffered chronic low back and hip pain for a few years

How do you treat Perfect Spot No. 12?

Although the quality of sensation in Perfect Spot No. 12 is usually among the deepest, most aching, and most relieving of all trigger point sensations in the body, about 25% of the time it can be sharper and hotter and not so pleasant. This is particularly true when the pressure is applied closer to the dimple/bump. This less satisfying feeling usually indicates either that the pressure is too much on the tendon, and you can move a little further down into the muscle proper (probably only a few millimetres) to get to the “good pain” — or it indicates a particularly tetchy TrP, and there’s nothing to be done except work through it slowly and gently.

The pressure tolerance of this spot varies widely from person to person — true of every trigger point, but once again Perfect Spot No. 12 is an especially good example. For those who have suffered low back pain or work in a chair, this spot may be extremely sensitive and require only gentle pressure with the tip of a finger. Others may easily tolerate your entire body weight delivered through the point of your elbow. Start gently, and slowly work your way up to the desired pressure.

Contracture in the gluteus maximus

Finally, on a scary note, when Perfect Spot No. 12 persists in the gluteus maximus for long enough, it can really do some damage.4

In 2006, researchers in Taiwan scanned some “tight asses” with an MRI machine. Specifically, they studied people with gluteus maximus contracture.

“Contracture” is a kind of über tightness in which muscle that has been tight for too long essentially freezes in place, just like your mother warned would happen to your face if you kept making ugly faces.

The MRIs showed that contracture causes your gluteus maximus to form a tough, fibrous, ropy band of muscle, while the rest of the muscle atrophies. Also, the tightness of the muscle pulls the IT band backwards (which can be an important factor in a common runner’s knee problem, iliotibial band syndrome).

Can you tell yourself if you’re contractured? It’s difficult to confirm the presence of contracture by touch alone, but the more obvious the ropy texture, the more likely it is to be contractured.

Dealing with contracture is a tricky business, perhaps almost impossible — even hard stretching will probably have no effect.6 Once a muscle like the gluteus maximus is contractured, TrP release becomes much more difficult. If you already have a very hard, ropy band of muscle in your gluteus maximus, you may get some relief from stimulating Perfect Spot No. 12 … but it probably won’t last very long.

 

 

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

LA Times Articles- May 30, 2015 -Stop slouching! Bad posture can lead to back pain, shoulder and knee injuries, and more. The spine gives structure to your life: Keep it fit with good posture.

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

Stop slouching! Bad posture can lead to back pain, shoulder and knee injuries, and more.

The spine gives structure to your life: Keep it fit with good posture
Keri Pegram shows good posture

UCLA physical therapist Keri Pegram, left, shows what good and bad posture looks like to her patient, Nathan Moore, 22, at UCLA Rehabilitation in Santa Monica. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
By Constance Sommer

Mayo Clinic

Stop slouching! Bad posture can lead to back pain, shoulder and knee injuries, and more
Tips to good posture: Much of this can be checked while you’re sitting there in your chair

Christiane Carman believed she had good posture. Then one day she woke up with a crick in her neck, a nagging little pain on the left side that didn’t go away. Soon it was shooting down her left arm. By the time she landed at UCLA’s Spine Clinic, the pain had become her everyday companion. Your problem, a physical therapist at the clinic, Keri Pegram, told her, is the way you sit at work. In other words, Carman had poor posture.

Posture can seem the sort of problem that is easily corrected. But when poor posture becomes a habit, experts say, it can lead to a host of problems, including back pain, ancillary injuries in the shoulders and knees, and struggles with balance and endurance.
Teens’ compulsive texting can cause neck injury, experts warn
Teens’ compulsive texting can cause neck injury, experts warn

“The more the muscles have to work,” said Alan Hilibrand, an orthopaedic spine surgeon and professor at Philadelphia’s Jefferson Medical College, “the more they get stressed and fatigued.”

Joint issues and back pain are the second and third most common chronic issues for which we see the doctor (after skin conditions like acne), according to a 2013 Mayo Clinic study. All told, Americans spend about $50 billion each year on lower back pain issues, reports the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health.

“It’s rare that a person does not have back pain in their lives in modern times,” said Esther Gokhale, a posture expert and teacher in Silicon Valley.
lRelated
Women find boost in ability and other benefits in strength training

Mind & Body
Women find boost in ability and other benefits in strength training

 

Often, poor posture is at the root of the problem.

“When someone has pain that’s going all over the place — you know, when they say, ‘I have knee pain and shoulder pain,’ I’ll say, ‘No, you’ve got to fix your posture,'” Pegram said. “It always comes back to the core.”

But many of us don’t even know where to begin. Told to stand up straighter, we throw our shoulders back and our chest forward. But that’s not good posture; that’s just reversing the problem.

“Good posture is balanced posture,” said Wendy Katzman, an associate professor of physical therapy and rehabilitation science at UC San Francisco. “The head is over the torso, which is over the pelvis.”
Good posture
Caption Good posture
Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times

UCLA physical therapist Keri Pegram shows what good posture looks like.
Bad posture
Caption Bad posture
Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times

Pegram also demonstrates what bad posture looks like.
Proper plank position
Caption Proper plank position
Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times

To help your posture, plank exercises can strengthen your core muscles. A proper plank position looks like a push-up, except your elbows are bent at 90 degrees and you’re resting your weight on your forearms. Your elbows should be right below your shoulders and your body should be in a straight line from your head to your feet.
Plank exercises
Caption Plank exercises
Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times

If resting your weight on your forearms is too difficult or painful, start with your arms straight instead. Try to hold a plank position for at least 10 seconds, working up over time to a goal of one minute.
Improve your posture
Caption Improve your posture
Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times

Core exercises to enhance posture can include arm and leg motion too, such as this quadruped.

And good posture isn’t just about standing. Sometimes we do the most damage when we sit incorrectly.

Pegram advises clients to sit on their hands and move around until they can feel the two bones at the bottom of their pelvis. “If you are on your tailbone,” she says, “you are already slouching. Even if it’s just a little bit, you are hurting your posture.”
cComments

Sleeping posture is just as important as sitting and standing posture. If you sleep on your side, use a knee pillow to keep hips in proper alignment to prevent back pain. Choose one that attaches to the leg, to stay in place all night.

What if you’re still not sure if you’re moving correctly? Or you simply forget? These days, of course, there are products to come to your rescue. The SitSmart device, by BackJoy, eases your fanny into the correct, upright position while you sit. The Up shirt, a fashion-forward T-shirt made in France, will push you back to proper posture when you start to slouch — and set you back a cool $150 in the process. And a smart device called the Lumo Lift will attach to your shirt or bra strap and ping when you slump — in addition to recording steps taken and calories consumed.

Gokhale wrote a book on the subject (“8 Steps to a Pain-Free Back”) and offers a six-class series on posture. Rajesh Natarajan, 45, of Los Gatos, Calif., took her classes after suffering from months of lower back pain and bouncing unsuccessfully from one practitioner to another. These days, he still has back spasms, but they resolve within a day, rather than lasting weeks or months.

“I discovered the basic logic of her teaching is: If you find a way to elongate your spine, your body stays in alignment,” said Natarajan. “The way you walk, stand, sit, it all has an impact.”

As for Carman, she’s learned tricks like not leaning into her computer when she types and pulling herself upright, rather than slouching, when she sits.

“It’s all little changes, but they make such a tremendous difference,” she said. “The question is: How can you be kinder to your spine, which is what holds you up so nicely?”

 

Tips to improving posture

Want to improve your posture? Here are three suggestions from Keri Pegram, a UCLA physical therapist:

–Find your sit bones. Those are the pressure points beneath your pelvis. Make sure you are sitting on them, and not your tailbone. Your tailbone should feel like it is behind you, and while you’re at it, your feet should be on the floor or a foot rest.

–Get a lumbar support cushion for your chair. That way you’re not always straightening yourself in your seat and you’re not straining your back, either

–Strengthen your core muscles, particularly with plank exercises. A proper plank position looks like a push-up, except your elbows are bent at 90 degrees and you’re resting your weight on your forearms. Your elbows should be right below your shoulders and your body should be in a straight line from your head to your feet. Try to hold the position for at least 10 seconds, working up over time to a goal of one minute. If forearms is too difficult or painful, start with your arms straight instead.
*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.

Hip Massage, Leg Massage, Massage for Tight IT Band, Tight Hip Flexors, Tight Adductors, Tight Illiacus, Tight Psosas and Piriformis, Tight Pectineus, Tight Calfs, Tight Gastrocnemius, Tight Hamstrings, Tight Achilles, Foot Rubs, Reflexology, Elbow Massages, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Ca.

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people. Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

side view calfs back hips legsback  leg musclesLeg front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Massage Santa Barbara. Deep Tissue Massage Santa Barbara, Swedish Massage Santa Barbara, Sports Massage Santa Barbara, Barefoot Massage Santa Barbara, Trigger Point Massage, Reflexology Massage, Professional Bodywork, Santa Barbara Massage, Massage Santa Barbara, Massage Ventura, Montecito, Carpinteria, Summerland, Goleta, Tri Counties Massage: Nicola, LMT. Licensed Massage Therapist. 805- 637-7482 On the EDGE Therapeutic Deep Tissue, Swedish Healing Massage: Massage Santa Barbara, Ventura, Montecito, Carpinteria, Summerland, Goleta, San Ynez Valley, Buelton and the Tri Counties., Ca.

Get results for Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,
Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.
Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue, Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482
Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)
Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.
ou need to accommodate your specific needs.

Get a 1 Hr, 1 1/2 Hr, 2 Hr, 2 1/2 Hr, 3 Hr, 3 1/2 Hr, or 4 Hour Long Massage Therapy Session, Sessions, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Long Massages Sessions

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Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

“To become more conscious is the greatest gift anyone can give to the world; moreover, in a ripple effect, the gift comes back to its source.”— Dr. David Hawkins …my teacher.

Intro. On-Line Only In-Call Special 1 1/4 hr $50.00…that’s 75 minutes (1st time client’s only) Mon – Fri Only if available plus  offering a Sliding Scale and Senior and  Veteran In-Call discounts with id.   Policies

 

Some clients just like long massages. Nicola offers  1 Hr, 1 1/2 Hr, 2 Hr, 2 1/2 Hr, 3 Hr, 3 1/2 Hr, or 4 Hour Long Massage Therapy Sessions, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Long Massages Sessions, Sports Body Flush,Therapeutic Pain Relief Therapy, Santa Barbara, Goleta Ca. Massage Therapist, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT.

 

Please call for an Appointment: 805-637-7482   Please no texts

 

FORMS –   Save Time and Download Helpful 1st Time Visit Intake Forms HERE

 

Our Journey in life. Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,  Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.   Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482  Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)  Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

Our Journey in life.

 

 

 

Any of the modalities or bodywork listed below can help Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip Pain, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg Pain, Knee Pain, Achilles Injuries, Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis), Chronic Pain, Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, Therapeutic Pain Relief Psoas and Illpsoas Pain, Scalenes Pain, Trapezius Pain,  (RSL) Massage for Symptoms of Restless Legs Syndrome, OM / Orthopedic Massage Relief, Lymphatic Drainage and any other muscle injuries,muscle strains, muscle pulls, and related injuries for pain relief and stress relief.

 

❶Nicola’s Modalities:  Deep Tissue Massage,  Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage, Ashiatsu, ShiatsuCompression Massage, Sports and Injury Massage, Therapeutic Massage, Orthopedic Massage  (OM)  Myofascial Release, Trigger Point MassageNeuromuscular ReleaseSwedish Massage, Relaxing Massage, Reflexology Massage, Chair Massage, Lymphatic Drainage and some Asian bodywork in the Goleta and Santa Barbara, Ca  area’s. He also offers Stress Relief Massage,Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety.

 

Nicola is a practicing licensed and insured professional LMT ( Licensed Massage Therapist) ( State Certification # 7239 ) and fine artist based in Goleta and Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients from athletes, artists, landscapers, UCSB, SBCC, Brooks students and faculty,  business people, educators, construction workers, elderly clients, house wives and tourists. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments either at his studio which is located in the Goleta, Ca area now.  He can also make professional appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness or can make home or out call or mobile massage visits in the Tri – Counties area. He also works with other local area professional massage therapists and can offer couples massages and can schedule male and female therapists to come to your home for a amazing couple’s massage. Maybe you own a business with a large group of people or have a large party of people.  Nicola can organize as many therapists as you need to accommodate your specific needs.

 

 

Riktr Pro Deep Tissue Massage Santa Barbara. Deep Tissue Massage Santa Barbara, Swedish Massage Santa Barbara, Sports Massage Santa Barbara, Barefoot Massage Santa Barbara, Trigger Point Massage, Reflexology Massage, Professional Bodywork, Santa Barbara Massage, Massage Santa Barbara, Massage Ventura, Montecito, Carpinteria, Summerland, Goleta, Tri Counties Massage: Nicola, LMT. Licensed Massage Therapist. 805- 637-7482 On the EDGE Therapeutic Deep Tissue, Swedish Healing Massage: Massage Santa Barbara, Ventura, Montecito, Carpinteria, Summerland, Goleta, San Ynez Valley, Buelton and the Tri Counties., Ca.

Get results for Neck Pain, Headaches, Migraines, Shoulder & Arm Pain, Carpal Tunnel Relief, Upper Back, Low Back Spasms, Sciatica, Torso Pain, Hip, Thigh, Hamstring and Calf Injuries, Leg, Knee, Achilles and Foot Pain, Chronic Pain,
Stress Relief, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction and any other injuries or muscle related injuries and pain.
Therapeutic Pain Relief Santa Barbara Goleta Massage, Trigger Point, Riktr Pro Deep Tissue, Swedish Massage, Nicola, LMT, 805-637-7482
Nicola (aka – Nick, Chris or Banduechy…so named by his handball buddies) is a California State Licensed and Insured LMT (Licenced Massage Therapist)
Professional BODY WORKER, by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Last Minute Appointments are OK if available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader.